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Lebbeus Woods, Slow Manifesto

Creator

Lebbeus Woods (1940-2012) is the author of several books published by Princeton Architectural Press books. Woods was an architectural illustrator.

A curation of Woods blog became a book edited by Clare Jacobson: Lebbeus Woods, Slow Manifesto

Purpose

The slow movement principles applied to architecture.

Manifesto

The new cities demand an architecture that rises from and sinks back into fluidity, into the turbulence of a continually changing matrix of conditions, into an eternal, ceaseless flux

architecture drawing its sinews from webbings of shifting forces, from patterns of unpredictable movements, from abrupt changes of mind, alterations of position, spontaneous disintegrations and syntheses

architecture resisting change, even as it flows from it, struggling to crystallize and become eternal, even as it is broken and scattered

architecture seeking nobility of presence, yet possessed of the knowledge that only the incomplete can claim nobility in a world of the gratuitous, the packaged, the promoted, the already sold

architecture seeking persistence in a world of the eternally perishing, itself giving way to the necessity of its moment

architecture writhing, twisted, rising, and pinioned to the uncertain moment, but not martyred, or sentimental, or pathetic, the coldness of its surfaces resisting all comfort

architecture that moves, slowly or quickly, delicately or violently, resisting the false assurance of stability

architecture that comforts, but only those who ask for no comfort

architecture of gypsies, who are driven from place to place, because they have no home

architecture of circuses, transient and unknown, but for the day and night of their departure

architecture of migrants, fleeing the advent of night’s bitter hunger

architecture of a philosophy of interference, the forms of which are infinitely varied, a vocabulary of words spoken only once, then forgotten

architecture bending and bending more, in continual struggle against gravity, against time, against, against, against

barbaric architecture, rough and insolent in its vitality and pride

sinuous architecture, winding endlessly and through a scaffolding of reasons

architecture caught in sudden light, then broken in a continuum of darkness

architecture embracing the sudden shifts of its too-delicate forms, therefore indifferent to its own destruction

architecture that destroys, but only with the coldness of profound respect

neglected architecture, insisting that its own beauty is deeper yet

abandoned architecture, not waiting to be filled, but serene in its transcendence

architecture that transmits the feel of movements and shifts, resonating with every force applied to it, because it both resists and gives way

architecture that moves, the better to gain its poise

architecture that insults politicians, because they cannot claim it as their own

architecture whose forms and spaces are the causes of rebellions, against them, against the world that brought them into being

architecture drawn as though it were already built

architecture built as though it had never been drawn

Source

https://lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com/2009/01/07/slow-manifesto/

Comment

A classic long list manifesto based on the slow movement. This time applied to architecture. It’s a good example of a philosophy – slow – being applied to a range of new areas.

More

Christopher Richards, The Slow Movement

Academic Slow Food Manifesto

 

Academic Slow Food Manifesto

Creator

‘Allegra Lab: Anthropology, Law, Art & World’ (allegralaboratory.net) is a collective of academics, an association and an online experiment founded in 2013. It explores creative ways to fill the ‘dead space’ that exists between traditional modes of academic publication and ongoing scholarly and societal debates. Allegra Lab discusses issues related to anthropology, law, art and beyond, and it is run by a diligent editorial team of professional scholars.

Purpose

Despite the name the Academic Slow Food Manifesto is not about food! This manifesto is a guide for better academic writing based on ‘real scholarship’ – which like the slow movement takes time to craft.

Manifesto

More more more!
This constant pressure to write more.
More of what?
Slogans, catch phrases?
Analysis for tid-bit quotations?
The same-old, same-old?
They want to stuff our brain
with indicators,
guidelines,
readily-chewed soundbites,
impact and
expected outcomes.
That is not stuff of real scholarship!
That is the stuff of auditing,
of successful annual reporting;
Signs of yielding to extra-academic pressures.
We reclaim the space
for the real pursuit
of unknown horizons,
Of reflection, philosophising
and mind-wandering
We want words, imagination, poetry!
Things impossible to report,
but only thus with real meaning.
But, like slow food,
REAL research takes time
to mature.
It needs tender love and caring;
A space to freely grow.
Less but more
of something
immeasurable
and only thus of true importance.

Source

http://allegralaboratory.net/academic-slow-food-manifesto/

Comment

A list-based manifesto is easy to create. All you need is a list of rules, qualities or statements one after the other.

In contrast, crafting a worldview manifesto takes a little more care and attention to put it all together. Thus this style of manifesto is a consistent fit for the aim: considered academic writing.

More: Four Types of Manifestos

More

Christopher Richards, The Slow Movement

Lebbeus Woods, Slow Manifesto

Todd Henry – Die Empty

Creator

Todd Henry - Die EmptyTodd Henry, Author of multiple books including:

  • The Accidental Creative
  • Louder than Words
  • Herding Tigers, and
  • Die Empty

Purpose

The clue is in the sub-title of the book: Unleash your best work every day

Manifesto – Die Empty

  1. Value your contribution
  2. Avoid mediocrity
  3. Define your battles
  4. Be fiercely curious
  5. Step out of your comfort zone
  6. Know yourself
  7. Be confidently adaptable
  8. Find your voice
  9. Stay connected
  10. Live EMPTY!

Source

Todd Henry, Die Empty

Comment

What a great book title! Die Empty is a powerful call to arms in only two words.

It’s a powerful declaration of your intent to live life in a particular way. I love this manifesto and it’s direct call to action.

I’ve written the chapter headings of Todd Henry’s book Die Empty as a 10-point list manifesto.

More

Book Review of Todd Henry’s Die Empty

And Todd Henry and Three Types of Work

Related

Die Empty is a Rules for Life manifesto. Here are some other manifesto’s that share rules for life:

Jordan B Peterson – 12 Rules for Life

Lori Deschene – Five Rules for Life

Brian Johnson – Five Rules for Life

Got Funny – The 36 Rules of Life

Dr Jordan B Peterson – 12 Rules for Life

Creator

Dr Jordan B Peterson, a Canadian clinical psychologist, and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto.

Purpose

The 12 Rules for Life are derived from his best selling book of the same name.

Manifesto

  1. Stand up straight with your shoulders back
  2. Treat yourself like someone you are responsible for helping
  3. Make friends with people who want the best for you
  4. Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today
  5. Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them
  6. Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world
  7. Pursue what is meaningful (not what is expedient)
  8. Tell the truth – or, at least, don’t lie
  9. Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you don’t
  10. Be precise in your speech
  11. Do not bother children when they are skateboarding
  12. Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street

Source

Peterson’s Wikipedia page

Comment

For me, there is a wonderful mismatch here. These are the 12 rules from a world-wide best selling book. And yet, they don’t seem that special. I expected they’d be miracle insights and instead they almost seem home-grown, down-to-earth and even folksy. This might be their charm and the reason they have cut through all of the noise out there.

More

The Most Valuable Things Everyone Should Know – a posting of 42 Life Rules on Quora by Peterson that preceded this book.

Related

Lori Deschene – Five Rules for Life

Brian Johnson – Five Rules for Life

Got Funny – The 36 Rules of Life

Charlie Sheen’s Manifesto for Life

Miyamoto Musahi – 21 Rules to Live Your Life – the great Samurai Warrior

 

The most valuable things everyone should know

Creator

Dr Jordan B Peterson, a Canadian clinical psychologist, and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. He is also the best-selling author of 12 Rules for Life, which is based on a dozen of these rules.

Peterson’s Wikipedia page

Purpose

Published on Quora in response to the question: What are the most valuable things everyone should know?

Note: This is often spoken of as ‘42 Rules’ even though there are only 40 rules.

Manifesto

  1. Tell the truth.
  2. Do not do things that you hate.
  3. Act so that you can tell the truth about how you act.
  4. Pursue what is meaningful, not what is expedient.
  5. If you have to choose, be the one who does things, instead of the one who is seen to do things.
  6. Pay attention.
  7. Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you need to know. Listen to them hard enough so that they will share it with you.
  8. Plan and work diligently to maintain the romance in your relationships.
  9. Be careful who you share good news with.
  10. Be careful who you share bad news with.
  11. Make at least one thing better every single place you go.
  12. Imagine who you could be, and then aim single-mindedly at that.
  13. Do not allow yourself to become arrogant or resentful.
  14. Try to make one room in your house as beautiful as possible.
  15. Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today.
  16. Work as hard as you possibly can on at least one thing and see what happens.
  17. If old memories still make you cry, write them down carefully and completely.
  18. Maintain your connections with people.
  19. Do not carelessly denigrate social institutions or artistic achievement.
  20. Treat yourself as if you were someone that you are responsible for helping.
  21. Ask someone to do you a small favour, so that he or she can ask you to do one in the future.
  22. Make friends with people who want the best for you.
  23. Do not try to rescue someone who does not want to be rescued, and be very careful about rescuing someone who does.
  24. Nothing well done is insignificant.
  25. Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world.
  26. Dress like the person you want to be.
  27. Be precise in your speech.
  28. Stand up straight with your shoulders back.
  29. Don’t avoid something frightening if it stands in your way — and don’t do unnecessarily dangerous things.
  30. Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them.
  31. Do not transform your wife into a maid.
  32. Do not hide unwanted things in the fog.
  33. Notice that opportunity lurks where responsibility has been abdicated.
  34. Read something written by someone great.
  35. Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street.
  36. Do not bother children when they are skateboarding.
  37. Don’t let bullies get away with it.
  38. Write a letter to the government if you see something that needs fixing — and propose a solution.
  39. Remember that what you do not yet know is more important than what you already know.
  40. Be grateful in spite of your suffering.

Sources

Quora article: https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-most-valuable-things-everyone-should-know

Reddit background comment: https://www.reddit.com/r/JordanPeterson/comments/75akn0/dr_jordan_petersons_42_rules_for_life_the_origins/

Comment

That’s a relatively long list. My opinion is that if you write too many on a list then you water down your focus. I think there is power in fewer.

Neuroscience tells us that we can only remember a handful of things in our short-term memory – it used to be 7 plus or minus 2 things. Now, it’s believed to be 5 plus or minus 2 things. That may or may not be a good basis for a powerful list.

Also, the secret to writing a short list is to first write a long one – then prune it back until you are left with the ones that strike a chord, fire your joy and make you dance.

More

12 Rules for Life

 

Lori Deschene – Five Rules For Life

Lori Deschene - Tiny BuddhaCreator

Lori Deschene, author of the blog and book Tiny Buddha.

Purpose

It’s a personal manifesto – some guidelines for living life.

Manifesto

  1. Be honest with yourself
  2. Let yourself be vulnerable
  3. Live in accordance with your values
  4. See as much as you can of what’s right in front of you
  5. Treat yourself like you want others to treat you

PS: Lori tells a beautiful story that when she first wrote her rules for life she wrote ‘Live without rules’ five times. LOL!

Source

https://tinybuddha.com/blog/5-rules-for-life/

Comment

A simple rule based manifesto. What I love about this is that a mere five rules can cover a lot of territory. The key is not to be too specific as in ‘Always eat blueberries on Thursday’. Instead, it pitches at the level of values or general principles.

Contrast this to the Yes Manifesto which has over 50 rules for life (dance and movement). Both strategies can work – choose your best way.

Number 5 stands out for me personally. It’s a wonderful reverse spin on the classic religious moral ‘treat others as you would like them to treat you.’

More

I loved reading Lori’s book, Tiny Buddha. I reviewed it here.

 

Yes Manifesto

Creator

Nadia in her own world – Dancer, choreographer, filmmaker, writer, and general public nuisance.

Purpose

“This is partially based on Yvonne Rainer’s 1965 “No Manifesto” which rejected traditions of theatricality to redefine dance. While I appreciate the value of rejecting the normative/cliche in the process of finding new possibilities, I think this “Yes Manifesto” better represents a current generation of artists who define innovation through what they include rather than what they exclude.”

Manifesto

Yes to spectacle.

Yes to plainness.

Yes to virtuosity.

Yes to full-out and fabulous.

Yes to pedestrian.

Yes to moving.

Yes to stillness.

Yes to breaking though physical limitations.

Yes to accepting physical limitations.

Yes to exploring and celebrating limitations.

Yes to magic.

Yes to realism.

Yes to narrative.

Yes to abstract.

Yes to movement for movement’s sake.

Yes to music.

Yes to Beethoven.

Yes to Beyonce.

Yes to banging and screaming.

Yes to silence.

Yes to style.

Yes to simplicity.

Yes to complex.

Yes to complicated.

Yes to star-power.

Yes to anonymity.

Yes to powerlessness.

Yes to stage faces.

Yes to actual faces.

Yes to deadpan.

Yes to being moved.

Yes to feeling.

Yes to cold intellectualism.

Yes to hot intellectualism.

Yes to eye candy.

Yes to eye vegetables.

Yes to high art.

Yes to low art.

Yes to medium art.

Yes to dancing on the proscenium stage.

Yes to dancing in the streets.

Yes to dancing on screens.

Yes to dancing in clubs.

Yes to dancing in your bedroom.

Yes to out-of-the-box.

Yes to inside-the-box.

Yes to jumping off the box.

Yes to crushing the box.

Yes to wearing the box on your head.

Yes to beauty.

Yes to ugly.

Yes to almost-beautiful and almost-ugly, and everything in-between and outside.

Yes, and . . .

Or at least maybe . . .

Source

https://nadiainherownworld.wordpress.com/2015/06/21/yes-manifesto/

Comment

This is a great example of an update and counterpoint to a previous idea or manifesto. In this case Yvonne Rainer said ‘No’ and Nadia says ‘Yes’.

This also highlights my point in my book Manifesto where I outline nine principles for creating your manifesto. One principle is focusing on what you are saying ‘yes’ – we want more of this! And another principles says ‘no’ – we want to stop this. Both work depending upon your situation and your intention.

Dave Bruno: The 100 Thing Challenge

Creator

Dave Bruno is the author of 100 Thing Challenge.

Dave Bruno, author of The 100 Thing ChallengePurpose

Dave Bruno was concerned about consumerism and decided to embark on a personal challenge to live for 12 months owning only 100 things.

Dave Bruno: The Eight Rules of the 100 Thing Challenge

  1. It’s Dave’s challenge – he wasn’t trying to change the world or anyone else
  2. Define ‘Personal’ things – are they things he owned solely or shared? As a parent and partner the line blurs here.
  3. Memorabilia – What counts in terms of special trinkets, trophies and reminders?
  4. Books – Is each book a single item or is a collection of books equal to one library?
  5. Some things are groups – He counted socks, jocks and undershirts as one group. It wouldn’t have been practical otherwise.
  6. Household items – There were some household items that were shared.
  7. Gifts – He gave himself 7 days to keep or not any gifts he received.
  8. New Things – He could still buy new things as long as he stayed at or below 100 things in total.

 Source

Dave Bruno’s website is at GuyNamedDave.com

Geoff’s Comment

Despite having the same name as Sebastian Terry’s manifesto 100 Things, the intent here is very different. And, whereas Sebastian’s list of 100 Things is a List Manifesto of things he wanted to do, Dave Bruno’s manifesto is a set of rules for how he wanted to play his game of limiting his life to 100 things or possessions.

It’s a great contrast between a list and a rules based manifesto. On the one hand Sebastian Terry has a list of end results and on the other Dave Bruno has a set of rules for getting to an end result. One is a focus on outcome, the other on process. Which do you prefer?

More

We reviewed Dave Bruno’s book 100 Things here.

 

Sebastian Terry – 100 Things

Sebastian Terry, author of 100 ThingsCreator

Sebastian Terry is the author of: 100 Things: What’s on your list?

Purpose

Sebastian wrote his bucket list after he asked himself this question: “If I knew I was going to die, would I change anything?”

If you knew you were going to die would you change anything? #manifesto Click To Tweet

Sebastian Terry 100 Things Manifesto

  1. Running with Bulls
  2. Marry a Stranger in Vegas
  3. Bet $1000 on Black (Roulette)
  4. Raise $100,000 for Camp Quality
  5. Save a Life
  6. Complete a Triathlon
  7. Feature in a Bollywood Movie
  8. Olympic Ski Jump
  9. Be in a Dance Video Clip
  10. Chase a Tornado
  11. Whale Shark Swim
  12. Visit a Death Row Inmate
  13. Be in a Medical Trial
  14. Burning Man Festival
  15. Stand Up Comedy Routine
  16. Street Performance
  17. Surf Safari
  18. Hit a Hole in One
  19. Guinness World Record
  20. Say Yes to Everything for One Week
  21. Speed Dating
  22. Participate in a Boxing Match
  23. Deliver a Baby
  24. Publish an Article
  25. Catch a Thief
  26. Help a Stranger
  27. Minister a Wedding
  28. Visit a Fortune Teller
  29. One Week’s Silence
  30. Join a Protest
  31. Build Something
  32. Learn Salsa
  33. Be a Contestant on a TV Game Show
  34. Kiss a Celebrity
  35. Find My Family Tree
  36. Walk Across a Country
  37. Be a Horse Jockey
  38. Be in a Hollywood Movie
  39. Read the National TV Weather Report
  40. Sail the Seas
  41. Buy a Stranger Lunch
  42. Cycle through Cuba
  43. Work at an Orphanage
  44. Represent a Country at Something
  45. Sumo Wrestling
  46. Learn French
  47. Go to Timbuktu
  48. Act in a Play
  49. Be a Weaponless and Harmless Matador
  50. Throw a Party
  51. Endurance Tandem Bike Ride
  52. Sports Streak
  53. Ice Fishing
  54. Scooter Across Australia
  55. Own a Company
  56. Tantric Lesson
  57. Cross a Desert
  58. Skydive Naked
  59. Attend and Extreme Religious Ceremony
  60. Throw a Dart at a Map and Visit the Country it Lands On
  61. Ultimate Prank
  62. Live on the Streets
  63. Get a Tattoo
  64. Challenge a World Champion
  65. Dad’s Dream Car
  66. Treacherous Trek
  67. Live on a Desert Island for One Week
  68. Invent Something
  69. Muster Cattle
  70. Meet Another ‘Sebastian Terry’
  71. Naked Rugby
  72. Stay Awake for Seventy Two Hours
  73. Get Shot
  74. Crazy Bid
  75. Pose Nude
  76. Surf River Wave
  77. Be a Team Mascot for a Day
  78. Perform an Original Song
  79. Live with a Tribe for One Week
  80. Have Something Named After Me
  81. Make a Beefeater Laugh
  82. Hitchhike Across America
  83. Foreign Aid
  84. Face a Shane Warne Over
  85. Go on an Adventure
  86. Marathon (Iron Man)
  87. Meditation
  88. Grow a Beard
  89. Playboy Mansion
  90. Land Diving
  91. Plant a Tree
  92. Haunted House
  93. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  94. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  95. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  96. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  97. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  98. Crash a Red Carpet
  99. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  100. Publish a Book

Source

100things.com.au

Comment

This is a classic List Manifesto or Bucket List.

I like the way Sebastian Terry knew he wanted 100 things (that’s a good round number) and then he left a few spots blank to fill in later. This is a great way to plan that allows for flexibility.

More

The Sebastian Terry book is a great read – a swashbuckling adventure. I blogged about it here. 

Compare this to Dave Bruno’s 100 Things – a very different approach to creating a manifesto.

Astronaut Hopefuls Manifesto

Astronaut Hopefuls Manifesto

Creator

Brian Shiro is a NOAA geophysicist, a NASA researcher, and co-founder of Astronauts for Hire. He’s also an astronaut hopeful!

Purpose

Brian Shiro wants to be an astronaut. And, now that NSAA has started to recruit more astronaut candidates he offers his top eight things that he has learnt from talking with astronauts and astronaut hopefuls.

Want to be an Astronaut? Here's 8 tips to launch your career #manifesto Click To Tweet

Astronaut Hopefuls Manifesto

  1. Clarify why you want to be an astronaut
  2. Set realistic expectations
  3. Every decision counts
  4. Prepare your body and mind
  5. Work well with others
  6. Meet people and learn from them
  7. NASA isn’t the only path one can take to become an astronaut
  8. Be authentic and enjoy the journey!

Source

http://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2015/12/15/the-astronaut-hopefuls-manifesto-an-insiders-guide-to-nasa-astronaut-selection/

Image: Wikipedia

Comment

A classically simple rule based manifesto written as a simple easy-to-read article. It also shows that you can write a manifesto about almost anything.

Most of his suggestions sound simple and would fit well in other manifestos. However, #7 stands out because it’s so specific to his topic.