Lebbeus Woods, Slow Manifesto

Creator

Lebbeus Woods (1940-2012) is the author of several books published by Princeton Architectural Press books. Woods was an architectural illustrator.

A curation of Woods blog became a book edited by Clare Jacobson: Lebbeus Woods, Slow Manifesto

Purpose

The slow movement principles applied to architecture.

Manifesto

The new cities demand an architecture that rises from and sinks back into fluidity, into the turbulence of a continually changing matrix of conditions, into an eternal, ceaseless flux

architecture drawing its sinews from webbings of shifting forces, from patterns of unpredictable movements, from abrupt changes of mind, alterations of position, spontaneous disintegrations and syntheses

architecture resisting change, even as it flows from it, struggling to crystallize and become eternal, even as it is broken and scattered

architecture seeking nobility of presence, yet possessed of the knowledge that only the incomplete can claim nobility in a world of the gratuitous, the packaged, the promoted, the already sold

architecture seeking persistence in a world of the eternally perishing, itself giving way to the necessity of its moment

architecture writhing, twisted, rising, and pinioned to the uncertain moment, but not martyred, or sentimental, or pathetic, the coldness of its surfaces resisting all comfort

architecture that moves, slowly or quickly, delicately or violently, resisting the false assurance of stability

architecture that comforts, but only those who ask for no comfort

architecture of gypsies, who are driven from place to place, because they have no home

architecture of circuses, transient and unknown, but for the day and night of their departure

architecture of migrants, fleeing the advent of night’s bitter hunger

architecture of a philosophy of interference, the forms of which are infinitely varied, a vocabulary of words spoken only once, then forgotten

architecture bending and bending more, in continual struggle against gravity, against time, against, against, against

barbaric architecture, rough and insolent in its vitality and pride

sinuous architecture, winding endlessly and through a scaffolding of reasons

architecture caught in sudden light, then broken in a continuum of darkness

architecture embracing the sudden shifts of its too-delicate forms, therefore indifferent to its own destruction

architecture that destroys, but only with the coldness of profound respect

neglected architecture, insisting that its own beauty is deeper yet

abandoned architecture, not waiting to be filled, but serene in its transcendence

architecture that transmits the feel of movements and shifts, resonating with every force applied to it, because it both resists and gives way

architecture that moves, the better to gain its poise

architecture that insults politicians, because they cannot claim it as their own

architecture whose forms and spaces are the causes of rebellions, against them, against the world that brought them into being

architecture drawn as though it were already built

architecture built as though it had never been drawn

Source

https://lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com/2009/01/07/slow-manifesto/

Comment

A classic long list manifesto based on the slow movement. This time applied to architecture. It’s a good example of a philosophy – slow – being applied to a range of new areas.

More

Christopher Richards, The Slow Movement

Academic Slow Food Manifesto

 

Yes Manifesto

Creator

Nadia in her own world – Dancer, choreographer, filmmaker, writer, and general public nuisance.

Purpose

“This is partially based on Yvonne Rainer’s 1965 “No Manifesto” which rejected traditions of theatricality to redefine dance. While I appreciate the value of rejecting the normative/cliche in the process of finding new possibilities, I think this “Yes Manifesto” better represents a current generation of artists who define innovation through what they include rather than what they exclude.”

Manifesto

Yes to spectacle.

Yes to plainness.

Yes to virtuosity.

Yes to full-out and fabulous.

Yes to pedestrian.

Yes to moving.

Yes to stillness.

Yes to breaking though physical limitations.

Yes to accepting physical limitations.

Yes to exploring and celebrating limitations.

Yes to magic.

Yes to realism.

Yes to narrative.

Yes to abstract.

Yes to movement for movement’s sake.

Yes to music.

Yes to Beethoven.

Yes to Beyonce.

Yes to banging and screaming.

Yes to silence.

Yes to style.

Yes to simplicity.

Yes to complex.

Yes to complicated.

Yes to star-power.

Yes to anonymity.

Yes to powerlessness.

Yes to stage faces.

Yes to actual faces.

Yes to deadpan.

Yes to being moved.

Yes to feeling.

Yes to cold intellectualism.

Yes to hot intellectualism.

Yes to eye candy.

Yes to eye vegetables.

Yes to high art.

Yes to low art.

Yes to medium art.

Yes to dancing on the proscenium stage.

Yes to dancing in the streets.

Yes to dancing on screens.

Yes to dancing in clubs.

Yes to dancing in your bedroom.

Yes to out-of-the-box.

Yes to inside-the-box.

Yes to jumping off the box.

Yes to crushing the box.

Yes to wearing the box on your head.

Yes to beauty.

Yes to ugly.

Yes to almost-beautiful and almost-ugly, and everything in-between and outside.

Yes, and . . .

Or at least maybe . . .

Source

https://nadiainherownworld.wordpress.com/2015/06/21/yes-manifesto/

Comment

This is a great example of an update and counterpoint to a previous idea or manifesto. In this case Yvonne Rainer said ‘No’ and Nadia says ‘Yes’.

This also highlights my point in my book Manifesto where I outline nine principles for creating your manifesto. One principle is focusing on what you are saying ‘yes’ – we want more of this! And another principles says ‘no’ – we want to stop this. Both work depending upon your situation and your intention.

Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie: We Are the World

Creator: Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie wrote the song “We Are The World” as a charity single in 1985. It was performed by the supergroup USA for Africa and sold over 20 million copies. The project was instigated by Harry Belafonte and Ken Kragen who selected Jackson and Richie to author the song.

Purpose: The song was created to support African famine relief and followed from the success of Band Aid’s “Do They Know It’s Christmas?”

We Are The World Manifesto

 

There comes a time when we hear a certain call
When the world must come together as one
There are people dying
and it’s time to lend a hand to life
Their greatest gift of all

We can’t go on pretending day by day
That someone, somewhere will soon make a change
We are all a part of God’s great big family
And the truth, you know,
Love is all we need

[Chorus:]
We are the world, we are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day
So let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
it’s true we’ll make a better day
Just you and me

Send them your heart so they’ll know that someone cares
And their lives will be stronger and free
As God has shown us by turning stones to bread
So we all must lend a helping hand

[Chorus]

When you’re down and out, there seems no hope at all
But if you just believe there’s no way we can fall
Let us realize that a change can only come
When we stand together as one

[Chorus]

Source

We Are The World on Wikipedia

Video on You Tube

Lyrics for We Are The World from AZLyrics.com

 

 

 

Peter Armstrong: The Lean Publishing Manifesto

Peter Armstrong: The Lean Publishing Manifesto

Creator: Peter Armstrong is the Co-founder of Leanpub and Ruboss. He is also the author of several books including Lean Publishing.

Purpose: Books and writing are changing. And given most books are written in isolation or in stealth it is easy to write a book that nobody wants to buy/read. The Lean Publishing Manifesto suggests a way around this.

Manifesto (highlights)

Lean Publishing is the act of self-publishing a book while you are writing it, evolving the book with feedback from your readers and finishing a first draft before using the traditional publishing workflow, with or without a publisher.

In short: Lean Publishing is the act of self-publishing an in-progress book.

 

The Lean Publishing How-To Guide for Non-Fiction

Step 1: Blog and Tweet to Find Your Voice and Build An Audience

Step 2: Write the Minimum Viable Book

What’s a Minimum Viable Book? It’s the smallest in-progress subset of your book that you could sell and be able to claim with a straight face that it is worth the money right now.

Step 3: Start Marketing and Selling the In-Progress Minimum Viable Book

Step 4: Finish the First Draft with Constant Feedback from your Readers

Step 5: Polish, Market and Sell the Completed Book, Possibly with a Traditional Publisher

 

Source

Complete Article and Manifesto

 

Nancy Scott: Helping My Friends Manifesto

Nancy Scott: Helping My Friends Manifesto

Creator: Nancy Scott is the founder of Liberty Communications Group, a boutique business communications agency in the Washington, D.C. area.

Purpose: Eight ground rules for when friends have asked you for creative advice.

The Helping My Friends Manifesto

??I’m happy that you’ve asked me for help. Normally, I charge (quite a bit) for this type of work, but I can definitely get you started for free. I want this to be fun for both of us, so it might help if we set some ground rules.

1. If you have a concept in mind — style, tone, appearance, layout, color, wording, headlines, copy, tagline, headers, font — please share your thoughts before I begin. The more detail, the better.

2. If you don’t have a concept in mind — in other words, if you are a blank slate who is simply saying “I need a brochure” — let’s agree that you have come to me for my skill and experience, upon which it makes sense to rely.

3. In this project we are about to undertake, I am the expert. Agreed?

4. Does the following statement sound like something you might say? “I don’t know what I want. I only know what I DON’T want.” If this is true, please provide me a point-by-point list of what you don’t want. Otherwise, I won’t be able to help you with this project.

5. Does the following statement sound like something you might say? “I don’t like it. I don’t know why. I just don’t like it.” Please understand that, in the hands of a professional, creative choices are driven both by talent and by reason. I will be able to tell you why I made a certain choice, so — in turn — you will need to tell me why you think a particular choice won’t work. Otherwise, please see #2, above.

6. When I show you the draft, if you have questions or concerns, I’ll be happy to explain why I’ve made certain creative choices.

7. Typically, my work includes one round of reasonable changes/alterations as part of the fee. Beyond that, I charge “x” dollars per hour. So, while I can draft something for you and make one set of reasonable changes, a wholesale “makeover” is not part of the deal. (Note: Time constraints related to paying work make it essential that I assume the role of “decider” as to what’s “reasonable.”) Agreed?

8. We are both free to say to one another “Let’s give this a rest.”

 

Source

Published on Business2Community.com on 12 September 2011

 

 

Trevor Boddy: HybridCity

Trevor Boddy: HybridCity

Creator: Trevor Boddy, a former architecture critic for the Vancouver Sun.

Purpose: To kick off the Design Thinking Unconference in Vancouver and to stimulate a health debate around the design of the city of Vancouver.

HybridCity Manifesto (edited)

Vancouver thrives when it embraces its many origins, peoples, ideas and forms. Vancouver falters when it strives for purity, isolation, unity of function. We are a city of hybrids, so integrated they slide into each other as hybridcity. Our metropolitan strength, our urban engine’s power is creative diversity—without it, we become brittle, uncaring and dull.

Inventing hybridcity: This city was invented at the stroke of a pen. In utterly no sense did vancouver evolve organically—as in standard urban narratives, be they of Etruscan Rome or Homer Simpson’s Springfield—but rather conceived in a single business and political contract for the Canadian Pacific Railway …For our hybridcity, I proclaim the Pentecostal potlatch, and celebrate Equinox, eid and easter with bubble tea!

Forgetting and denying hybridcity: …Vancouver will never be at peace until it reconciles with its indigenaity, a cornerstone of hybridcity. Vancouver must also confront its history of apartheid. Early ‘racial zoning’ mandated asians’ residences and businesses to be located in Chinatown’s few blocks, and nowhere else…

Building hybridcity: Vancouver now grows never before-seen hybrids of building forms and types: thin condo high rises set on townhouse podia (a hybrid of mid-levels hong kong with Brooklyn Brownstones); towers laminating office with residential with hotel; four condo skyscrapers erupting up out of a costco; a village for 400 residents set on the roof of a home depot, itself set on a save-on foods…

Hybridcity now: Real estate is Vancouver’s civil religion, and marketers, politicians, developers and planners are the descending ranks of its priestly class. …Vancouverites need to understand that their Hybridcity—as artifact and idea—is the creation of public policy. …To make ours the greenest city will require a lot of greenwashing. Hybrids can be sterile, or they can flourish—the choice is yours.

 

Source

Post by Jenny Uechi on the Vancouver Observer website: Trevor Boddy on how to design Vancouver into a better city – 16 August 2011.

Image edited from photo by Parisa Asadi from the above post.