Todd Henry – Die Empty

Creator

Todd Henry - Die EmptyTodd Henry, Author of multiple books including:

  • The Accidental Creative
  • Louder than Words
  • Herding Tigers, and
  • Die Empty

Purpose

The clue is in the sub-title of the book: Unleash your best work every day

Manifesto – Die Empty

  1. Value your contribution
  2. Avoid mediocrity
  3. Define your battles
  4. Be fiercely curious
  5. Step out of your comfort zone
  6. Know yourself
  7. Be confidently adaptable
  8. Find your voice
  9. Stay connected
  10. Live EMPTY!

Source

Todd Henry, Die Empty

Comment

What a great book title! Die Empty is a powerful call to arms in only two words.

It’s a powerful declaration of your intent to live life in a particular way. I love this manifesto and it’s direct call to action.

I’ve written the chapter headings of Todd Henry’s book Die Empty as a 10-point list manifesto.

More

Book Review of Todd Henry’s Die Empty

And Todd Henry and Three Types of Work

Related

Die Empty is a Rules for Life manifesto. Here are some other manifesto’s that share rules for life:

Jordan B Peterson – 12 Rules for Life

Lori Deschene – Five Rules for Life

Brian Johnson – Five Rules for Life

Got Funny – The 36 Rules of Life

Dr Jordan B Peterson – 12 Rules for Life

Creator

Dr Jordan B Peterson, a Canadian clinical psychologist, and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto.

Purpose

The 12 Rules for Life are derived from his best selling book of the same name.

Manifesto

  1. Stand up straight with your shoulders back
  2. Treat yourself like someone you are responsible for helping
  3. Make friends with people who want the best for you
  4. Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today
  5. Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them
  6. Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world
  7. Pursue what is meaningful (not what is expedient)
  8. Tell the truth – or, at least, don’t lie
  9. Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you don’t
  10. Be precise in your speech
  11. Do not bother children when they are skateboarding
  12. Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street

Source

Peterson’s Wikipedia page

Comment

For me, there is a wonderful mismatch here. These are the 12 rules from a world-wide best selling book. And yet, they don’t seem that special. I expected they’d be miracle insights and instead they almost seem home-grown, down-to-earth and even folksy. This might be their charm and the reason they have cut through all of the noise out there.

More

The Most Valuable Things Everyone Should Know – a posting of 42 Life Rules on Quora by Peterson that preceded this book.

Related

Lori Deschene – Five Rules for Life

Brian Johnson – Five Rules for Life

Got Funny – The 36 Rules of Life

Charlie Sheen’s Manifesto for Life

Miyamoto Musahi – 21 Rules to Live Your Life – the great Samurai Warrior

 

The most valuable things everyone should know

Creator

Dr Jordan B Peterson, a Canadian clinical psychologist, and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. He is also the best-selling author of 12 Rules for Life, which is based on a dozen of these rules.

Peterson’s Wikipedia page

Purpose

Published on Quora in response to the question: What are the most valuable things everyone should know?

Note: This is often spoken of as ‘42 Rules’ even though there are only 40 rules.

Manifesto

  1. Tell the truth.
  2. Do not do things that you hate.
  3. Act so that you can tell the truth about how you act.
  4. Pursue what is meaningful, not what is expedient.
  5. If you have to choose, be the one who does things, instead of the one who is seen to do things.
  6. Pay attention.
  7. Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you need to know. Listen to them hard enough so that they will share it with you.
  8. Plan and work diligently to maintain the romance in your relationships.
  9. Be careful who you share good news with.
  10. Be careful who you share bad news with.
  11. Make at least one thing better every single place you go.
  12. Imagine who you could be, and then aim single-mindedly at that.
  13. Do not allow yourself to become arrogant or resentful.
  14. Try to make one room in your house as beautiful as possible.
  15. Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today.
  16. Work as hard as you possibly can on at least one thing and see what happens.
  17. If old memories still make you cry, write them down carefully and completely.
  18. Maintain your connections with people.
  19. Do not carelessly denigrate social institutions or artistic achievement.
  20. Treat yourself as if you were someone that you are responsible for helping.
  21. Ask someone to do you a small favour, so that he or she can ask you to do one in the future.
  22. Make friends with people who want the best for you.
  23. Do not try to rescue someone who does not want to be rescued, and be very careful about rescuing someone who does.
  24. Nothing well done is insignificant.
  25. Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world.
  26. Dress like the person you want to be.
  27. Be precise in your speech.
  28. Stand up straight with your shoulders back.
  29. Don’t avoid something frightening if it stands in your way — and don’t do unnecessarily dangerous things.
  30. Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them.
  31. Do not transform your wife into a maid.
  32. Do not hide unwanted things in the fog.
  33. Notice that opportunity lurks where responsibility has been abdicated.
  34. Read something written by someone great.
  35. Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street.
  36. Do not bother children when they are skateboarding.
  37. Don’t let bullies get away with it.
  38. Write a letter to the government if you see something that needs fixing — and propose a solution.
  39. Remember that what you do not yet know is more important than what you already know.
  40. Be grateful in spite of your suffering.

Sources

Quora article: https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-most-valuable-things-everyone-should-know

Reddit background comment: https://www.reddit.com/r/JordanPeterson/comments/75akn0/dr_jordan_petersons_42_rules_for_life_the_origins/

Comment

That’s a relatively long list. My opinion is that if you write too many on a list then you water down your focus. I think there is power in fewer.

Neuroscience tells us that we can only remember a handful of things in our short-term memory – it used to be 7 plus or minus 2 things. Now, it’s believed to be 5 plus or minus 2 things. That may or may not be a good basis for a powerful list.

Also, the secret to writing a short list is to first write a long one – then prune it back until you are left with the ones that strike a chord, fire your joy and make you dance.

More

12 Rules for Life

 

Lori Deschene – Five Rules For Life

Lori Deschene - Tiny BuddhaCreator

Lori Deschene, author of the blog and book Tiny Buddha.

Purpose

It’s a personal manifesto – some guidelines for living life.

Manifesto

  1. Be honest with yourself
  2. Let yourself be vulnerable
  3. Live in accordance with your values
  4. See as much as you can of what’s right in front of you
  5. Treat yourself like you want others to treat you

PS: Lori tells a beautiful story that when she first wrote her rules for life she wrote ‘Live without rules’ five times. LOL!

Source

https://tinybuddha.com/blog/5-rules-for-life/

Comment

A simple rule based manifesto. What I love about this is that a mere five rules can cover a lot of territory. The key is not to be too specific as in ‘Always eat blueberries on Thursday’. Instead, it pitches at the level of values or general principles.

Contrast this to the Yes Manifesto which has over 50 rules for life (dance and movement). Both strategies can work – choose your best way.

Number 5 stands out for me personally. It’s a wonderful reverse spin on the classic religious moral ‘treat others as you would like them to treat you.’

More

I loved reading Lori’s book, Tiny Buddha. I reviewed it here.

 

Yes Manifesto

Creator

Nadia in her own world – Dancer, choreographer, filmmaker, writer, and general public nuisance.

Purpose

“This is partially based on Yvonne Rainer’s 1965 “No Manifesto” which rejected traditions of theatricality to redefine dance. While I appreciate the value of rejecting the normative/cliche in the process of finding new possibilities, I think this “Yes Manifesto” better represents a current generation of artists who define innovation through what they include rather than what they exclude.”

Manifesto

Yes to spectacle.

Yes to plainness.

Yes to virtuosity.

Yes to full-out and fabulous.

Yes to pedestrian.

Yes to moving.

Yes to stillness.

Yes to breaking though physical limitations.

Yes to accepting physical limitations.

Yes to exploring and celebrating limitations.

Yes to magic.

Yes to realism.

Yes to narrative.

Yes to abstract.

Yes to movement for movement’s sake.

Yes to music.

Yes to Beethoven.

Yes to Beyonce.

Yes to banging and screaming.

Yes to silence.

Yes to style.

Yes to simplicity.

Yes to complex.

Yes to complicated.

Yes to star-power.

Yes to anonymity.

Yes to powerlessness.

Yes to stage faces.

Yes to actual faces.

Yes to deadpan.

Yes to being moved.

Yes to feeling.

Yes to cold intellectualism.

Yes to hot intellectualism.

Yes to eye candy.

Yes to eye vegetables.

Yes to high art.

Yes to low art.

Yes to medium art.

Yes to dancing on the proscenium stage.

Yes to dancing in the streets.

Yes to dancing on screens.

Yes to dancing in clubs.

Yes to dancing in your bedroom.

Yes to out-of-the-box.

Yes to inside-the-box.

Yes to jumping off the box.

Yes to crushing the box.

Yes to wearing the box on your head.

Yes to beauty.

Yes to ugly.

Yes to almost-beautiful and almost-ugly, and everything in-between and outside.

Yes, and . . .

Or at least maybe . . .

Source

https://nadiainherownworld.wordpress.com/2015/06/21/yes-manifesto/

Comment

This is a great example of an update and counterpoint to a previous idea or manifesto. In this case Yvonne Rainer said ‘No’ and Nadia says ‘Yes’.

This also highlights my point in my book Manifesto where I outline nine principles for creating your manifesto. One principle is focusing on what you are saying ‘yes’ – we want more of this! And another principles says ‘no’ – we want to stop this. Both work depending upon your situation and your intention.

Jamie Oliver: Feed Me Even Better

Jamie Oliver: Feed Me Even Better

Creator: Jamie Oliver is an internationally known celebrity chef with a passion for good grub and healthy eating.

Purpose: The document is a series of recommendations to the Government School Food Policy Review. It’s aim is persuade the government to increase funding for school meals and food education.

Manifesto – Foreword

“More must be done to invest in an all-round food education for our kids; one that includes learning about where food comes from and how it’s grown as well as the hands-on experience of cooking in the classroom.

I strongly believe that teaching our kids these life skills gives them the best start in life, for their own health, the health of their kids and their kids’ kids.

And if our kids are also getting a tasty, nutritious meal at lunchtime, their prospects are even better.

It’s been proven time and time again during the last five years that a healthy school meal improves a child’s ability to learn and do well at school.

We can’t ignore that; we must continue to feed our children better, even better.

We must invest in our kids; they are the future and they deserve it.”

 

Key Points

  1. More money for school food
  2. Nutritional standards for all schools
  3. Teach kids about food
  4. Provide training for teachers
  5. Every school a food-growing school
  6. Creative capital funding guidance
  7. Ofsted (food inspections)
  8. Pupil premium to give poorer pupils access to good food

 

Source

Found here: Edexec.co.uk – includes link to download complete manifesto

More here at JamieOliver.com and the Jamie Oliver Foundation

 

 

 

Gala Darling: The Radical Self Love Manifesto

The Radical Self Love Manifesto

Creator: Gala Darling is a writer, nomad and international playgirl with an unrelenting devotion to positivity and magic! (official bio). And, author of ‘Love and Sequins’ and named one of the 10 most influential style bloggers in the world by Fashionista.

Purpose: Because “you are your own best investment”.

The Radical Self Love Manifesto (selected highlights)

Strike up conversations with strangers.

Travel is essential to the spirit.

A pair of great shoes means nothing if you have an ugly heart.

Many things in this world are more important than money.

You are your own best investment.

Do more of what you love.

Create your own family and care for them ferociously.

Stay eager.

Love yourself.

Say yes to the adventure of life.

 

Source

Complete manifesto on GalaDarling.com

 

 

Robbin Phillips: Personal Manifesto

Robbin Phillips: Personal Manifesto

Creator: Robbin Phillips is the founder and president of Brains On Fire, we “help organisations build movements.” She is also an evangelist of all things simple.

Purpose: As a statement of intention and to make that intention public.

Personal Manifesto

Wake up every morning with a grateful heart.

Laugh hard and often.

See the lightness in both work and play.

Keep your body strong.

Be a role model for others, especially your family.

Eat real food.

Practice kindness.

Forgive even when it seems impossible.

Live a simple life.

Give away more than you consume.

See the world with the eyes of a child.

Try something that scares you every day.

Listen more than you speak.

 

Source

Blog post on BrainsOnFire.com – 16 September 2011

Image of Robbin Phillips from BrainsOnFire.com

 

The Stranger: Increased Bike and Pedestrian Safety

The Stranger: Bike and Pedestrian Safety Manifesto

Creator: The Stranger is a Seattle Washington based magazine.

Purpose: “Cyclists are dying, collisions are rising, and people who claim that there is a “War on Cars” are out of control—it’s time for a reality check and an action plan.”

Manifesto (edited)

I. The car-driving class must pay its own way!

For cars we have paved our forests, spanned our lakes, and burrowed under our cities. Yet drivers throw tantrums at the painting of a mere bicycle lane on the street. They balk at the mere suggestion of hiking a car-tab fee, raising the gas tax, or tolling to help pay for their insatiable demands, even as downtrodden transit riders have seen fares rise 80 percent over four years.

No more! We demand that car drivers pay their own way, bearing the full cost of the automobile-petroleum-industrial complex that has depleted our environment, strangled our cities, and drawn our nation into foreign wars. Reinstate the progressive motor vehicle excise tax, hike the gas tax, and toll every freeway, bridge, and neighborhood street until the true cost of driving lies as heavy and noxious as our smog-laden air. Our present system of hidden subsidies is the opiate of the car-driving masses; only when it is totally withdrawn will our road-building addiction finally be broken.

II. All power to the people’s transit

If Seattle is to become a people’s paradise, our buses, rail, streetcars, and ferries must stretch into every neighborhood, running reliably, affordably, and at all hours of the day and night. Since mass transit serves the masses, the mass of our transportation dollars must hereafter be spent to meet its needs.

III. The pedestrian and bicycle classes must be protected. And served!

The history of transportation is the history of struggle between the drivers and the nondrivers whose lives and limbs have literally been crushed…

The bikers and walkers, which neither slurp government dollars nor consume natural resources at the pace of the drivers, demand safer streets and sidewalks. As the Economist suggested on September 3 when responding to Seattle’s spate of recent cyclist deaths, cars on streets with bike lanes must be subjected to “traffic calming” methods already used in European capitals like Amsterdam, Copenhagen, and Portland. When cars must slow down below 20 miles per hour, they kill less than 5 percent of collision victims. And the busiest bike lanes must be physically protected from the four-wheeled instruments of death through concrete buffers, rows of trees, or other barriers. In some places, whole streets—yes, whole streets, we have plenty to spare—must be closed to cars, creating bike and pedestrian malls and paths of the kind found throughout more forward-thinking, class-conscious cities.

We make these demands because, unfortunately, we must. Our epoch, the epoch of the car, possesses this distinct feature: It has created a simplified antagonism. Seattle as a whole is now more and more splitting up into two great hostile camps, into two great classes directly fighting each other—car driver and nondriver.

This antagonism traces directly to the creation of the modern car driver, a privileged individual who, as noted, is the beneficiary of a long course of subsidies, tax incentives, and wars for cheap oil. But the same subsidies that created this creature (who now rages about the roads while simultaneously screaming of being a victim in some war) can—and must, beginning now—be used to build bike lanes, sidewalks, light rail, and other benefits to the nondriving classes.

 

Source

Complete article Stranger Staff post on TheStranger.com – 13 September 2011

Image from the above page by James Yamasaki

 

Craig Robertson: I Believe – My Personal Foundation

Craig Robertson: I Believe Personal Manifesto

Creator: Craig Robertson is a Motivator,  a Motivational Speaker and Coach trained in Sports Psychology based in Auckland.  His passion is helping people find their passion and true heart based motivation to perform ‘in the zone’ in business and sport.

Purpose: Because it’s time to stand up and stand out!

My Manifesto

I believe every human has a unique make-up and unique talents, hence if we are aware of our true purpose, awake in the moment and follow our heart, great wisdom and a natural flow will occur in business and life.

I beleive when on purpose and in the present moment, a more intuitive balanced flow of success produces wonderful synchronicity and great satisfaction in life.

I believe true happiness in life results from emotional self-understanding to be authentic in expression which is the real source of inner freedom and self-belief.

I believe things happen for a reason, nothing is an accident, hence any obstacle is education if we are awake in the moment. Allowing ourself to see the learning, free from auto-judgment to live in the moment, to trust and feel free to manifest our true desires.

I believe the new consciousness is an auto flow, to achieve without strain and pushing, to stay relaxed is a choice if we achieve from a place of clarity in our personal foundation unleashing a natural passionate flow of intuitive success.

 

Source

Blog post on CraigRobertsonBlog.com – 12 May 2011