Blog

The most valuable things everyone should know

Creator

Dr Jordan B Peterson, a Canadian clinical psychologist, and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. He is also the best-selling author of 12 Rules for Life, which is based on a dozen of these rules.

Peterson’s Wikipedia page

Purpose

Published on Quora in response to the question: What are the most valuable things everyone should know?

Note: This is often spoken of as ‘42 Rules’ even though there are only 40 rules.

Manifesto

  1. Tell the truth.
  2. Do not do things that you hate.
  3. Act so that you can tell the truth about how you act.
  4. Pursue what is meaningful, not what is expedient.
  5. If you have to choose, be the one who does things, instead of the one who is seen to do things.
  6. Pay attention.
  7. Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you need to know. Listen to them hard enough so that they will share it with you.
  8. Plan and work diligently to maintain the romance in your relationships.
  9. Be careful who you share good news with.
  10. Be careful who you share bad news with.
  11. Make at least one thing better every single place you go.
  12. Imagine who you could be, and then aim single-mindedly at that.
  13. Do not allow yourself to become arrogant or resentful.
  14. Try to make one room in your house as beautiful as possible.
  15. Compare yourself to who you were yesterday, not to who someone else is today.
  16. Work as hard as you possibly can on at least one thing and see what happens.
  17. If old memories still make you cry, write them down carefully and completely.
  18. Maintain your connections with people.
  19. Do not carelessly denigrate social institutions or artistic achievement.
  20. Treat yourself as if you were someone that you are responsible for helping.
  21. Ask someone to do you a small favour, so that he or she can ask you to do one in the future.
  22. Make friends with people who want the best for you.
  23. Do not try to rescue someone who does not want to be rescued, and be very careful about rescuing someone who does.
  24. Nothing well done is insignificant.
  25. Set your house in perfect order before you criticize the world.
  26. Dress like the person you want to be.
  27. Be precise in your speech.
  28. Stand up straight with your shoulders back.
  29. Don’t avoid something frightening if it stands in your way — and don’t do unnecessarily dangerous things.
  30. Do not let your children do anything that makes you dislike them.
  31. Do not transform your wife into a maid.
  32. Do not hide unwanted things in the fog.
  33. Notice that opportunity lurks where responsibility has been abdicated.
  34. Read something written by someone great.
  35. Pet a cat when you encounter one on the street.
  36. Do not bother children when they are skateboarding.
  37. Don’t let bullies get away with it.
  38. Write a letter to the government if you see something that needs fixing — and propose a solution.
  39. Remember that what you do not yet know is more important than what you already know.
  40. Be grateful in spite of your suffering.

Sources

Quora article: https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-most-valuable-things-everyone-should-know

Reddit background comment: https://www.reddit.com/r/JordanPeterson/comments/75akn0/dr_jordan_petersons_42_rules_for_life_the_origins/

Comment

That’s a relatively long list. My opinion is that if you write too many on a list then you water down your focus. I think there is power in fewer.

Neuroscience tells us that we can only remember a handful of things in our short-term memory – it used to be 7 plus or minus 2 things. Now, it’s believed to be 5 plus or minus 2 things. That may or may not be a good basis for a powerful list.

Also, the secret to writing a short list is to first write a long one – then prune it back until you are left with the ones that strike a chord, fire your joy and make you dance.

More

12 Rules for Life

 

Lori Deschene – Five Rules For Life

Lori Deschene - Tiny BuddhaCreator

Lori Deschene, author of the blog and book Tiny Buddha.

Purpose

It’s a personal manifesto – some guidelines for living life.

Manifesto

  1. Be honest with yourself
  2. Let yourself be vulnerable
  3. Live in accordance with your values
  4. See as much as you can of what’s right in front of you
  5. Treat yourself like you want others to treat you

PS: Lori tells a beautiful story that when she first wrote her rules for life she wrote ‘Live without rules’ five times. LOL!

Source

https://tinybuddha.com/blog/5-rules-for-life/

Comment

A simple rule based manifesto. What I love about this is that a mere five rules can cover a lot of territory. The key is not to be too specific as in ‘Always eat blueberries on Thursday’. Instead, it pitches at the level of values or general principles.

Contrast this to the Yes Manifesto which has over 50 rules for life (dance and movement). Both strategies can work – choose your best way.

Number 5 stands out for me personally. It’s a wonderful reverse spin on the classic religious moral ‘treat others as you would like them to treat you.’

More

I loved reading Lori’s book, Tiny Buddha. I reviewed it here.

 

Yes Manifesto

Creator

Nadia in her own world – Dancer, choreographer, filmmaker, writer, and general public nuisance.

Purpose

“This is partially based on Yvonne Rainer’s 1965 “No Manifesto” which rejected traditions of theatricality to redefine dance. While I appreciate the value of rejecting the normative/cliche in the process of finding new possibilities, I think this “Yes Manifesto” better represents a current generation of artists who define innovation through what they include rather than what they exclude.”

Manifesto

Yes to spectacle.

Yes to plainness.

Yes to virtuosity.

Yes to full-out and fabulous.

Yes to pedestrian.

Yes to moving.

Yes to stillness.

Yes to breaking though physical limitations.

Yes to accepting physical limitations.

Yes to exploring and celebrating limitations.

Yes to magic.

Yes to realism.

Yes to narrative.

Yes to abstract.

Yes to movement for movement’s sake.

Yes to music.

Yes to Beethoven.

Yes to Beyonce.

Yes to banging and screaming.

Yes to silence.

Yes to style.

Yes to simplicity.

Yes to complex.

Yes to complicated.

Yes to star-power.

Yes to anonymity.

Yes to powerlessness.

Yes to stage faces.

Yes to actual faces.

Yes to deadpan.

Yes to being moved.

Yes to feeling.

Yes to cold intellectualism.

Yes to hot intellectualism.

Yes to eye candy.

Yes to eye vegetables.

Yes to high art.

Yes to low art.

Yes to medium art.

Yes to dancing on the proscenium stage.

Yes to dancing in the streets.

Yes to dancing on screens.

Yes to dancing in clubs.

Yes to dancing in your bedroom.

Yes to out-of-the-box.

Yes to inside-the-box.

Yes to jumping off the box.

Yes to crushing the box.

Yes to wearing the box on your head.

Yes to beauty.

Yes to ugly.

Yes to almost-beautiful and almost-ugly, and everything in-between and outside.

Yes, and . . .

Or at least maybe . . .

Source

https://nadiainherownworld.wordpress.com/2015/06/21/yes-manifesto/

Comment

This is a great example of an update and counterpoint to a previous idea or manifesto. In this case Yvonne Rainer said ‘No’ and Nadia says ‘Yes’.

This also highlights my point in my book Manifesto where I outline nine principles for creating your manifesto. One principle is focusing on what you are saying ‘yes’ – we want more of this! And another principles says ‘no’ – we want to stop this. Both work depending upon your situation and your intention.

Dave Bruno: The 100 Thing Challenge

Creator

Dave Bruno is the author of 100 Thing Challenge.

Dave Bruno, author of The 100 Thing ChallengePurpose

Dave Bruno was concerned about consumerism and decided to embark on a personal challenge to live for 12 months owning only 100 things.

Dave Bruno: The Eight Rules of the 100 Thing Challenge

  1. It’s Dave’s challenge – he wasn’t trying to change the world or anyone else
  2. Define ‘Personal’ things – are they things he owned solely or shared? As a parent and partner the line blurs here.
  3. Memorabilia – What counts in terms of special trinkets, trophies and reminders?
  4. Books – Is each book a single item or is a collection of books equal to one library?
  5. Some things are groups – He counted socks, jocks and undershirts as one group. It wouldn’t have been practical otherwise.
  6. Household items – There were some household items that were shared.
  7. Gifts – He gave himself 7 days to keep or not any gifts he received.
  8. New Things – He could still buy new things as long as he stayed at or below 100 things in total.

 Source

Dave Bruno’s website is at GuyNamedDave.com

Geoff’s Comment

Despite having the same name as Sebastian Terry’s manifesto 100 Things, the intent here is very different. And, whereas Sebastian’s list of 100 Things is a List Manifesto of things he wanted to do, Dave Bruno’s manifesto is a set of rules for how he wanted to play his game of limiting his life to 100 things or possessions.

It’s a great contrast between a list and a rules based manifesto. On the one hand Sebastian Terry has a list of end results and on the other Dave Bruno has a set of rules for getting to an end result. One is a focus on outcome, the other on process. Which do you prefer?

More

We reviewed Dave Bruno’s book 100 Things here.

 

Sebastian Terry – 100 Things

Sebastian Terry, author of 100 ThingsCreator

Sebastian Terry is the author of: 100 Things: What’s on your list?

Purpose

Sebastian wrote his bucket list after he asked himself this question: “If I knew I was going to die, would I change anything?”

If you knew you were going to die would you change anything? #manifesto Click To Tweet

Sebastian Terry 100 Things Manifesto

  1. Running with Bulls
  2. Marry a Stranger in Vegas
  3. Bet $1000 on Black (Roulette)
  4. Raise $100,000 for Camp Quality
  5. Save a Life
  6. Complete a Triathlon
  7. Feature in a Bollywood Movie
  8. Olympic Ski Jump
  9. Be in a Dance Video Clip
  10. Chase a Tornado
  11. Whale Shark Swim
  12. Visit a Death Row Inmate
  13. Be in a Medical Trial
  14. Burning Man Festival
  15. Stand Up Comedy Routine
  16. Street Performance
  17. Surf Safari
  18. Hit a Hole in One
  19. Guinness World Record
  20. Say Yes to Everything for One Week
  21. Speed Dating
  22. Participate in a Boxing Match
  23. Deliver a Baby
  24. Publish an Article
  25. Catch a Thief
  26. Help a Stranger
  27. Minister a Wedding
  28. Visit a Fortune Teller
  29. One Week’s Silence
  30. Join a Protest
  31. Build Something
  32. Learn Salsa
  33. Be a Contestant on a TV Game Show
  34. Kiss a Celebrity
  35. Find My Family Tree
  36. Walk Across a Country
  37. Be a Horse Jockey
  38. Be in a Hollywood Movie
  39. Read the National TV Weather Report
  40. Sail the Seas
  41. Buy a Stranger Lunch
  42. Cycle through Cuba
  43. Work at an Orphanage
  44. Represent a Country at Something
  45. Sumo Wrestling
  46. Learn French
  47. Go to Timbuktu
  48. Act in a Play
  49. Be a Weaponless and Harmless Matador
  50. Throw a Party
  51. Endurance Tandem Bike Ride
  52. Sports Streak
  53. Ice Fishing
  54. Scooter Across Australia
  55. Own a Company
  56. Tantric Lesson
  57. Cross a Desert
  58. Skydive Naked
  59. Attend and Extreme Religious Ceremony
  60. Throw a Dart at a Map and Visit the Country it Lands On
  61. Ultimate Prank
  62. Live on the Streets
  63. Get a Tattoo
  64. Challenge a World Champion
  65. Dad’s Dream Car
  66. Treacherous Trek
  67. Live on a Desert Island for One Week
  68. Invent Something
  69. Muster Cattle
  70. Meet Another ‘Sebastian Terry’
  71. Naked Rugby
  72. Stay Awake for Seventy Two Hours
  73. Get Shot
  74. Crazy Bid
  75. Pose Nude
  76. Surf River Wave
  77. Be a Team Mascot for a Day
  78. Perform an Original Song
  79. Live with a Tribe for One Week
  80. Have Something Named After Me
  81. Make a Beefeater Laugh
  82. Hitchhike Across America
  83. Foreign Aid
  84. Face a Shane Warne Over
  85. Go on an Adventure
  86. Marathon (Iron Man)
  87. Meditation
  88. Grow a Beard
  89. Playboy Mansion
  90. Land Diving
  91. Plant a Tree
  92. Haunted House
  93. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  94. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  95. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  96. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  97. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  98. Crash a Red Carpet
  99. For Auction on behalf of Camp Quality
  100. Publish a Book

Source

100things.com.au

Comment

This is a classic List Manifesto or Bucket List.

I like the way Sebastian Terry knew he wanted 100 things (that’s a good round number) and then he left a few spots blank to fill in later. This is a great way to plan that allows for flexibility.

More

The Sebastian Terry book is a great read – a swashbuckling adventure. I blogged about it here. 

Compare this to Dave Bruno’s 100 Things – a very different approach to creating a manifesto.

Astronaut Hopefuls Manifesto

Astronaut Hopefuls Manifesto

Creator

Brian Shiro is a NOAA geophysicist, a NASA researcher, and co-founder of Astronauts for Hire. He’s also an astronaut hopeful!

Purpose

Brian Shiro wants to be an astronaut. And, now that NSAA has started to recruit more astronaut candidates he offers his top eight things that he has learnt from talking with astronauts and astronaut hopefuls.

Want to be an Astronaut? Here's 8 tips to launch your career #manifesto Click To Tweet

Astronaut Hopefuls Manifesto

  1. Clarify why you want to be an astronaut
  2. Set realistic expectations
  3. Every decision counts
  4. Prepare your body and mind
  5. Work well with others
  6. Meet people and learn from them
  7. NASA isn’t the only path one can take to become an astronaut
  8. Be authentic and enjoy the journey!

Source

http://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2015/12/15/the-astronaut-hopefuls-manifesto-an-insiders-guide-to-nasa-astronaut-selection/

Image: Wikipedia

Comment

A classically simple rule based manifesto written as a simple easy-to-read article. It also shows that you can write a manifesto about almost anything.

Most of his suggestions sound simple and would fit well in other manifestos. However, #7 stands out because it’s so specific to his topic.

 

Expert Manifesto – Seven Ideals

The Expert Manifesto

Creator

The Expert Manifesto was designed by Geoff McDonald. He is the creator of 1000Manifestos.com. Also, the author of The Manifesto Manifesto.

Purpose

The Expert Manifesto outlines the seven ideals of being a business expert. These ideals are for building a profitable global business around your expertise.

Business Experts: The seven ideals for creating your highly profitable global business #manifesto Click To Tweet

Expert Manifesto

  1. Own Your Own Niche: it’s not enough to claim a niche, it’s crucial to own one that you have created.
  2. Attract Your Ideal Clients: why work with just anyone? If you set the goal of having ideal clients you can build a business that serves only them. This is likely to be more profitable and enjoyable.
  3. Unite with a Double Sided Vision: Most mission and vision statements are selfish – they’re all about you and don’t include your clients.
  4. Share a Philosophy to Buy into: Your ideal clients are not buying a mere product or service. To build lifetime loyalty you want them to buy into your philosophy for life, business or success.
  5. Build an Idea that Scales: An expert is an expert because of the things they know and the ideas they create. If your idea doesn’t scale then you severely limit your chances of building a profitable global business.
  6. Play a Game Worth Winning: It must be a game that you and your clients want to win.
  7. Write the Rules for Success: When you write the rules for success then you become the expert in the game.

Source

GeoffMcDonald.com/manifesto

Comment

This is a simple 7-part rule based manifesto for speakers, trainers, coaches, thought leaders, consultants and an internal expert within an organisation.

What do you mean by ‘a Double Sided Vision’? This is an important aspect of creating a manifesto that provokes interest and curiosity.

With the ebook it’s a good example of how a simple manifesto can become a scalable idea. As a manifesto it is a simple 7 line document that could fit neatly on a postcard or a social media image. The ebook shows that once you can easily expand the manifesto into products and services.

More

The Expert Manifesto ebook can be downloaded here: GeoffMcDonald.com/manifesto

 

The Solo, Micro & Small Business Manifesto

Flying Solo - The Solo, Micro & Small Business Manifesto

Creator

The Solo, Micro & Small Business Manifesto was created by Flying Solo – a solo, micro and small business community with headquarters in Sydney Australia.

Purpose

The Solo, Micro & Small Business Manifesto is a summary of “what we believe makes a successful and happy soloist.” A soloist is a person who runs a solo, micro or small business.

Create a business and a life you love: Solo, Micro & Small Business #Manifesto Click To Tweet

The Solo, Micro & Small Business Manifesto

Why I have chosen soloism

  • Unlike employment, soloism allows me to feel liberated not obligated
  • In Soloville the playing fields are perfectly level.
  • Work assumes its proper place alongside the rest of my life.
  • I prefer working in the absence of a formal workplace structure.
  • Soloism allows me to create my own measures of success.
  • I have the freedom to be spontaneous.
  • Soloism enables me to make the most of being myself.
  • I get to keep my priorities at the top of my action list.

Why I am suited to flying solo

  • I maintain a healthy level of self-confidence.
  • I’m self-aware and naturally inquisitive.
  • I enjoy being mentally stimulated.
  • I strive for authenticity and integrity in all I do.
  • I’m proactive and enjoy fully participating.
  • I hold myself accountable and do not make excuses.
  • I am disciplined and responsible with money.

Why it’s so good for me

  • I have the freedom to fully express myself through my work.
  • What I do is totally congruent with who I am.
  • I feel an overriding sense of freedom each and every day.
  • I face my future head-on. There?s no hiding.
  • I do not have to unwind. The pace of my business is the pace of my life.
  • Soloism constantly stretches and challenges my boundaries and limitations.
  • Soloism gives me the confidence to hold my ground.

What I believe

  • I know that if others can do it, I can do it.
  • If this is a ‘job’, it’s a damn fine one!
  • I champion innovation and free thinking.
  • Live for the present and enjoy it to the full.
  • I respect the relationship between beliefs and outcomes and channel my thoughts accordingly.
  • If I?m not passionate about my work, I need to do something else.
  • With the right attitude I?ll be a magnet for inspirational ideas.
  • An inspiring vision must always be at the heart of my solo venture.
  • Being myself is not just good for my soul, it?s good for business.
  • By loving my work I attract opportunities and promote word-of-mouth referrals.
  • It’s better to be heard well by one person than forgotten by five hundred.
  • The secret to managing time is to first know what I?m trying to do with it.

The way I work

  • I run my solo business as I choose.
  • I set my own pace.
  • I engage and participate fully in all that I do.
  • I don’t need permission to take a break from anyone other than me.
  • I don’t need to follow the example of bigger businesses.
  • I focus on what I have, not on what I do not have.
  • I conduct my business from wherever I choose.
  • I freely share my knowledge and wisdom with others.
  • I listen deeply to my clients and prospects, developing genuine empathy with them.
  • I have balance within life and work, not between life and work.
  • I position myself firmly in the flow of ideas, influences and information.
  • I like to get the ear of influential people.
  • I take responsibility for my mistakes.
  • While I may do what others do, I strive to do it better and do it my way.
  • I acknowledge the role of research and development in the evolution of my business.
  • I consider my clients and customers to be my partners.
  • I attach great importance to the relationships around me.
  • I work to surround myself with supporters.
  • I do not binge; I’m consistent in my actions.
  • I know when and where to focus my energies.
  • I know the value of my work and charge accordingly.
  • I have determined my rates and do not work for less.
  • I do not carry junk and clutter in my work.
  • I have a clear means of reviewing my performance and do so regularly.
  • I protect my energy sources by taking breaks.
  • I put myself first.

Source

The Solo, Micro & Small Business Manifesto

Comment

The Solo, Micro & Small Business Manifesto fits beautifully with Principle #5 of the Manifesto Manifesto: ‘Manifestos define us’ in their use of the words ‘soloism’ and ‘soloist’. Whilst they’re not the most elegant words they do give the people who run a solo business a name and an identity. This

I think this manifesto needs an edit. There are some great themes and values here that I resonate with in my solo business. However, it feels like it was created by a committee that couldn’t make a decision. It’s trying to cover too much territory and loses it’s impact. It could be split into several related manifestos or simply edited.

 

Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie: We Are the World

Creator: Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie wrote the song “We Are The World” as a charity single in 1985. It was performed by the supergroup USA for Africa and sold over 20 million copies. The project was instigated by Harry Belafonte and Ken Kragen who selected Jackson and Richie to author the song.

Purpose: The song was created to support African famine relief and followed from the success of Band Aid’s “Do They Know It’s Christmas?”

We Are The World Manifesto

 

There comes a time when we hear a certain call
When the world must come together as one
There are people dying
and it’s time to lend a hand to life
Their greatest gift of all

We can’t go on pretending day by day
That someone, somewhere will soon make a change
We are all a part of God’s great big family
And the truth, you know,
Love is all we need

[Chorus:]
We are the world, we are the children
We are the ones who make a brighter day
So let’s start giving
There’s a choice we’re making
We’re saving our own lives
it’s true we’ll make a better day
Just you and me

Send them your heart so they’ll know that someone cares
And their lives will be stronger and free
As God has shown us by turning stones to bread
So we all must lend a helping hand

[Chorus]

When you’re down and out, there seems no hope at all
But if you just believe there’s no way we can fall
Let us realize that a change can only come
When we stand together as one

[Chorus]

Source

We Are The World on Wikipedia

Video on You Tube

Lyrics for We Are The World from AZLyrics.com

 

 

 

Declaration of the Occupation of New York City

Creator: Kpete on DemocraticUnderground.com

Purpose: “to express a feeling of mass injustice, we must not lose sight of what brought us together. We write so that all people who feel wronged by the corporate forces of the world can know that we are your allies.”

Manifesto: Declaration of the Occupation of New York City

Occupy Wall Street PosterAs we gather together in solidarity to express a feeling of mass injustice, we must not lose sight of what brought us together. We write so that all people who feel wronged by the corporate forces of the world can know that we are your allies.

As one people, united, we acknowledge the reality: that the future of the human race requires the cooperation of its members; that our system must protect our rights, and upon corruption of that system, it is up to the individuals to protect their own rights, and those of their neighbors; that a democratic government derives its just power from the people, but corporations do not seek consent to extract wealth from the people and the Earth; and that no true democracy is attainable when the process is determined by economic power. We come to you at a time when corporations, which place profit over people, self-interest over justice, and oppression over equality, run our governments. We have peaceably assembled here, as is our right, to let these facts be known.

They have taken our houses through an illegal foreclosure process, despite not having the original mortgage.

They have taken bailouts from taxpayers with impunity, and continue to give Executives exorbitant bonuses.

They have perpetuated inequality and discrimination in the workplace based on age, the color of one’s skin, sex, gender identity and sexual orientation.

They have poisoned the food supply through negligence, and undermined the farming system through monopolization.

They have profited off of the torture, confinement, and cruel treatment of countless nonhuman animals, and actively hide these practices.

They have continuously sought to strip employees of the right to negotiate for better pay and safer working conditions.

They have held students hostage with tens of thousands of dollars of debt on education, which is itself a human right.

They have consistently outsourced labor and used that outsourcing as leverage to cut workers’ healthcare and pay.

They have influenced the courts to achieve the same rights as people, with none of the culpability or responsibility.

They have spent millions of dollars on legal teams that look for ways to get them out of contracts in regards to health insurance.

They have sold our privacy as a commodity.

They have used the military and police force to prevent freedom of the press. They have deliberately declined to recall faulty products endangering lives in pursuit of profit.

They determine economic policy, despite the catastrophic failures their policies have produced and continue to produce.

They have donated large sums of money to politicians supposed to be regulating them. They continue to block alternate forms of energy to keep us dependent on oil.

They continue to block generic forms of medicine that could save people’s lives in order to protect investments that have already turned a substantive profit.

They have purposely covered up oil spills, accidents, faulty bookkeeping, and inactive ingredients in pursuit of profit.

They purposefully keep people misinformed and fearful through their control of the media.

They have accepted private contracts to murder prisoners even when presented with serious doubts about their guilt.

They have perpetuated colonialism at home and abroad. They have participated in the torture and murder of innocent civilians overseas.

They continue to create weapons of mass destruction in order to receive government contracts. *

 

To the people of the world,

We, the New York City General Assembly occupying Wall Street in Liberty Square, urge you to assert your power.

Exercise your right to peaceably assemble; occupy public space; create a process to address the problems we face, and generate solutions accessible to everyone.

To all communities that take action and form groups in the spirit of direct democracy, we offer support, documentation, and all of the resources at our disposal.

Join us and make your voices heard!

*These grievances are not all-inclusive.

http://nycga.cc/

Source

Thanks to Bill Jennings for sharing this one.

Discussion Board Item on DemocraticUnderground.com – Posted 30 September 2011

Related to this manifesto: The Occupy Wall Street Manifesto

The image is the Occupy Wall Street Poster, sourced at Forbes.com in an article by James Marshall Crotty