Microsoft Carbon Negative Pledge 2030

Creator

Microsoft is a US based international technology company that produces both software and hardware. They are best known for their Microsoft Office software suite, Xbox video game consoles and the Microsoft Surface touchscreen computers.

Purpose

“The scientific consensus is clear. The world confronts an urgent carbon problem. The carbon in our atmosphere has created a blanket of gas that traps heat and is changing the world’s climate. Already, the planet’s temperature has risen by 1 degree centigrade. If we don’t curb emissions, and temperatures continue to climb, science tells us that the results will be catastrophic.”

Microsoft Carbon Negative Pledge 2030 launch with the senior leadership team
Microsoft President Brad Smith, Chief Financial Officer Amy Hood and CEO Satya Nadella preparing to announce Microsoft’s plan to be carbon negative by 2030. (Jan. 15, 2020/Photo by Brian Smale)

Manifesto

While the world will need to reach net zero, those of us who can afford to move faster and go further should do so. That’s why today we are announcing an ambitious goal and a new plan to reduce and ultimately remove Microsoft’s carbon footprint.

By 2030 Microsoft will be carbon negative, and by 2050 Microsoft will remove from the environment all the carbon the company has emitted either directly or by electrical consumption since it was founded in 1975.

We recognize that progress requires not just a bold goal but a detailed plan. As described below, we are launching today an aggressive program to cut our carbon emissions by more than half by 2030, both for our direct emissions and for our entire supply and value chain. We will fund this in part by expanding our internal carbon fee, in place since 2012 and increased last year, to start charging not only our direct emissions, but those from our supply and value chains.

Taking a Principled Approach

Whenever we take on a new and complex societal issue, we strive first to learn and then to define a principled approach to guide our efforts. This has been fundamental to our work around the protection of privacy and the ethical development of artificial intelligence, and it’s the approach we’re taking to pursue our aggressive carbon goals as well. We’ve concluded that seven principles, or elements, will be vital as we continually innovate and take additional steps on an ongoing basis.

  1. Grounding in science and math. We will continually ground our work in the best available science and most accurate math, as we describe further below.
  2. Taking responsibility for our carbon footprint. We will take responsibility for all our emissions, so by 2030 we can cut them by more than half and remove more carbon than we emit each year.
  3. Investing for new carbon reduction and removal technology. We will deploy $1 billion of our own capital in a new Climate Innovation Fund to accelerate the development of carbon reduction and removal technologies that will help us and the world become carbon negative.
  4. Empowering customers around the world. Perhaps most importantly, we will develop and deploy digital technology to help our suppliers and customers reduce their carbon footprints.
  5. Ensuring effective transparency. We will publish an annual Environmental Sustainability Report that provides transparency on our progress, based on strong global reporting standards.
  6. Using our voice on carbon-related public policy issues. We will support new public policy initiatives to accelerate carbon reduction and removal opportunities.
  7. Enlisting our employees. We recognize that our employees will be our biggest asset in advancing innovation, and we will create new opportunities to enable them to contribute to our efforts.

Source

https://blogs.microsoft.com/blog/2020/01/16/microsoft-will-be-carbon-negative-by-2030/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft

Thanks to Carolyn Butler-Madden for sharing this with me.

Comment

This is a great example of a manifesto in action – and a good model to follow.

It starts with the motivation: “The world confronts an urgent carbon problem.”

Next is the declaration that says – this is what we are going to do about this: “By 2030 Microsoft will be carbon negative.”

Then to turn the idea into a plan, Microsoft have identified 7 key principles to follow.

The principles are the strategy for how Microsoft will become carbon negative by 2030.

This includes the key point of who is going to be involved here and what we need to do to engage and support them – empower customers, enlist employees and importantly use their voice to lead the conversation.

Finally, they point to big opportunity as impacting their entire supply chain. It’s not just a ‘we’ll look after our own backyard’ approach. Instead, it’s a holistic and ultimately collaborative approach.

This is leadership!

More

Renewable UK – Cymru Renewable Energy Manifesto

UN – Sustainable Development Goals

Qantas Customer Charter

Rackspace Core Values

Creator

Rackspace provide IT services

Purpose

“Company values provide the guiding light for our vision”

Rackspace

Manifesto

“Rackspace accelerates the value of the cloud. We meet you where you are and get you where you need to go, helping you realize the power of digital transformation without the complexity and expense of managing it on your own.

We deliver unbiased expertise through our comprehensive portfolio of managed services — across applications, data, security and infrastructure on the world’s leading cloud platforms — with proven results.

And we wrap all of our services in Fanatical Experience™: the proactive, results-obsessed approach to serving customers that has driven us for two decades.”

Values

Fanatical support in all we do
Results first, substance over flash
Committed to greatness
Full disclosure and transparency
Passion for our work
Treat fellow Rackers like friends and family

Source

http://slides.com/caillouet/rackspace-core-values#/8

https://www.rackspace.com/en-au/about

Thanks to Bill for sharing this manifesto

Comment

I’m a fan of having values and identifying what’s important to you.

I’m not a fan of the way they are typically used – particularly in organisations.

Too often I see a handful of words written on a website or even in the foyer of the main office that say grand things like: We value integrity, honesty, self-reliance…

But that is all. The values are never seen or heard of again.

If you simply leave your values at the level ‘a word’ then the meaning and benefit of having them is lost because no one knows what they mean and nobody lives true to them.

The Rackspace values are at least a short phrase. They provide greater context and sharper intent than a single word. For instance, ‘fanatical support’ is a clear intent. It’s not just ‘support’; it’s fanatical.

Also, I love the naming of their community: Rackers. It might not be the most elegant name and it is a strong call to identity. By having a name for your people it’s more likely you can call to them and ultimately unite them.

More

Apple Corporate Values

Zappos Core Values Frog

Helen Reddy – I am woman (a classic call to identity)

Bernadette Jiwa – A Love Note to Entrepreneurs

Creator

Bernadette Jiwa is a storytelling expert who has published eight #1 Amazon Bestsellers.

Purpose

To motivate, inspire and encourage entrepreneurs.

Bernadette Jiwa - A Love Note to Entrepreneurs

Manifesto

A Love Note to Entrepreneurs

Don’t wait for permission

Change something you care about
Touch one person
Make a difference to a handful

Launch ideas form the heart
Build a legacy, not just an empire
Keep your values front and center
Understand why you’re doing this
Remember, it doesn’t have to matter to everyone

Learn how to see the world as it isn’t
Allow possibility to feed your soul
Embrace failure alongside success

Make people your inspiration
Let passion be your master
Make meaning your currency

Never allow fear to get in your way
Know the questions to ask
Don’t be afraid of the answers

If you do anything today, would ‘THIS’ be it?
If not this, then what?

Source

https://thestoryoftelling.com/if-love-note-to-entrepreneurs/

Comment

Manifestos come in many different forms.

Many are declarations about what the author wants or aspires to. This might fit that category, albeit in disguise.

Other manifestos are a call to arms to other people. This one definitely fits that – it’s a call to entrepreneurs to keep going.

It stands out because of it’s soft touch – it’s not a set of commandments or rules or even principles. Instead, it’s offered with kindness and love.

More

Derek Sivers – A New Kind of Entrepreneur

James Altucher – The 20 Habits of Eventual Millionaires

Opted Out of Life Manifesto

The Seven Rules of Done

Creator

Geoff McDonald, author of Done and curator of 1000Manifestos.com

Purpose

The Seven Rules – They are rules because they are principles, guidelines, actions, procedures and hopefully useful! They are the seven key ideas that allow us to move from the usual way of doing project planning to the more holistic view of project design.

Geoff McDonald - Done: How to finish your projects when traditional ways don't work

Manifesto

1 Stop planning!

The old saying suggests that ‘if we fail to plan, we plan to fail’. But planning is not enough – particularly when it only describes what are we are going to do. We need to stop planning and start designing to include our motivations, inspirations, and passion for our projects.

2 Don’t fix your problems

We all know what we want. But most of what we want is to fix something that went wrong in our past. This is limiting and it’s not satisfying either. Instead, we need to clear the decks of our past if we want to create a truly compelling future.

3 Inner over outer

When we fail at things we presume we are the failure. And that we are fatally flawed in some way. That’s human nature. But the real problem is we fail because we choose the wrong type of goal. We need to focus on our internal motivations to keep us going when we face the dip, an obstacle or simply when it all gets too hard.

4 Rules rule!

As the world has become more complex our plans for the future have also become more complex. Fighting complexity with more complexity is a recipe for confusion, chaos, and disaster. Instead, we need to develop simple rules to make it easier to navigate in complex situations. Think traffic lights!

5 Ship smaller sooner

Traditionally we aim to deliver one big thing at the end of our projects. The problem with this approach is the lack of feedback. This leaves us wide open for creating something that nobody wants. Been there, done that! That’s a short cut to “Why did I waste my time doing that?” Or worse, “What is wrong with these people, don’t they recognise my brilliant work?” That’s not going to lead you to a happy place. Instead, we need to create smaller versions of our final big thing to find out what will ultimately work.

6 Structure shapes success

The usual story is that we fail because of a lack of willpower, discipline or focus. This only tells part of the story as there are forces bigger than us at work impacting us in invisible ways. Therefore, we need to design our environments to promote the behaviours we want and to stifle those we don’t.

7 You have to change

When we create our projects our focus is naturally on the end result. However, if that’s all we do we miss a big opportunity. The real purpose of our project is to create a change in our situation and to make that change stick. To do that we need to change!

Source

Geoff McDonald and his book Done: How to finish your projects when traditional ways don’t work

Comment

The language we use in our manifesto is the key to giving it a decisive edge.

There’s something strong and definitive about saying things are ‘rules’. It implies following them, sticking to them and using them as boundaries.

Compare this to principles, guidelines, things… All useful but provide a different flavour to our message.

Further, the rules that follow also need to have a mix of familiarity and intrigue. I believe some need to be relatively obvious – for instance, most people will understand ‘rules rule’. It implies that rules are important.

In contrast, ‘inner over outer’ is less obvious. It begs the question, what specifically is ‘in and out’ referring to? In this case it’s about inner and outer motivation styles.

Stop Planning is another interesting rule because it is provocative – it challenges our usual thinking.

Plus, we want our rules to be sexy and slightly clever (not too clever). For instance, the alliteration (using the same sound or letter) of ‘Ship Smaller Sooner’ rolls off the tongue and becomes a snappy idea. It’s much more engaging than ‘Get things done quicker’.

When you’re writing your manifesto, pay attention to the words you use – words have meaning and impact. Choose carefully. Play with a thesaurus to figure out the right ones. And test this with a live audience face-to-face to reveal their emotional impact.

More

Geoff McDonald, The Manifesto Manifesto

Geoff McDonald, The Expert Manifesto

The Cult of Done

Qantas Customer Charter

Creator

Qantas is one of the world’s oldest airlines formed in 1920 in outback Queensland. Qantas is a leading long distance airline and one of Australia’s strongest brands.

Purpose

“We are Australia’s leading premium airline and we are dedicated to being the best.

We aim to meet your expectations every time you fly, and so we continue to invest in our business and will always strive to provide you with an exceptional level of service.

With this charter, we want you to know what you can expect whenever you choose to fly on a Qantas (QF) coded service from anywhere in Australia. Below we set out our commitment to you and provide links to our website where more detailed information is available.”

Manifesto

  1. We will never compromise on safety
  2. We are committed to getting you and your bags to your destination on time
  3. We will look after you if things don’t go as planned
  4. We will look after you if you have specific needs
  5. We are always on hand to help
  6. We value your opinion
  7. We will protect your personal information
  8. We support environmental initiativies

Source

https://www.qantas.com/au/en/about-us/our-company/customer-charter.html

Comment

This is a strong clear airline specific customer charter that is consistent with what I see the Qantas brand to be.

(There is a paragraph that goes with each of the points above that I felt was too long to share all of it here.)

In comparison to the Easy Jet Customer Charter the difference in brand personality and therefore the words used in this charter are clear – Qantas is more formal, Easy Jet is more casual.

Given they are both in the same industry you would expect some similarities. The obvious one is number one for both companies: safety first – even down to the wording ‘we never compromise’.

I particularly like that where Qantas say ‘We are always on hand to help’ they share a phone that you can call and a link to further ways to contact them.

Also, under the section ‘We value your opinion’ they offer several ways to this with them – phone, website form and even Twitter. Plus, if things go badly they even share the details of the Airline Customer Advocate service.

This is all part of the ‘backend’ or supporting actions that you will want to consider when you create your manifesto and in particular your Customer Charter. You don’t want to be seen to be offering hollow words. You do want to be seen as acting consistent with what you say will you do and who you will be for your customers – especially when things don’t go as you plan.

More

Easy Jet Customer Charter

Joseph Jaffe – The Customer Service Manifesto

Christopher Carfi – The Social Customer Manifesto

Four Pillars Gin

Creator

Four Pillars Gin is an award-winning distiller of gin based in Healesville, in Victoria’s Yarra Valley, about 65 kilometres from Melbourne.

Purpose

“We established Four Pillars with a focus on gin. But great gin doesn’t just make itself. We recognised that our real focus would need to be on the craft of distilling.

If we could elevate this area of expertise in Australia, and bring a modern Australian sensibility to the process, then maybe we could make a gin worth shouting about.”

Four Pillars Gin

Manifesto

Pillar 1: The Stills
Meet Wilma, our original magnificent copper-pot still

Pillar 2: The Water
The best in the world, from our home in the Yarra Valley

Pillar 3: The Botanicals
Asian spice, Mediterranean citrus and native Australian botanicals

Pillar 4: A Little of Love
A commitment to craft and attention to detail every step of the way

Source

https://www.fourpillarsgin.com.au/distilling/our-four-pillars/

Comment

This is a deceptively simple and clever manifesto.

With only four components, it’s easy to digest. Great start!

The first (the stills) states the quality of equipment they use. The second and third pillars (water and botanicals) point to the quality of the ingredients they use. And the fourth pillar addresses the quality that the makers will bring to their craft.

Given these are all qualities it’s a highly aspirational set of company values. What I like about it is that they are practical values rather than the usual personal values (eg integrity), which can be vague when applied across an entire organisation.

The purpose statement (above) is simply included in a story about their business. For me, it’s shows that this manifesto likely started out from the maker’s perspective – these are the things we need to do to make world-class gin.

That’s a great place to start with your manifesto – what do you need to do to be successful in your chosen field? Aspire to these qualities.

However, like all great brands, these internal qualities also become the external ones that your customers measure your success against.

For me, I don’t know anything about gin. I rarely even drink it. But, I do know from reading this manifesto that there is a pursuit of quality here that is validated by the international awards they have received. As a potential customer, it gives me a reference point for trusting them and trusting their product, which makes it more likely that I would buy it compared to others that lack this.  

Also, if you read their website, there are some gentle stories which add flavour to the message.

In particular, I loved the story: “…We took delivery of our own custom-built still from Carl of Germany, and we called her Wilma (after Cameron’s beautiful but explosively tempered late mother). And Wilma turned out to be amazing, drawing extraordinary botanical flavour from a combination of rare, native and traditional botanicals.”

Now, that’s bringing your values to life for your customers!

Finally, pillars. A pillar is literally a column or upright structure used to support a building. Pillars are strong. The language you use to define your manifesto is important. Do you have values, pillars, a pledge, commandments or even a manifesto?

In this case, they have literally taken these pillars to heart and named their business: Four Pillars Gin. Now, that’s putting your manifesto in the centre of everything you do. While not essential, it is a strong statement.

Choose your words wisely because they provide an edge to your meaning and your branding.

More

Wikipedia Five Pillars

Nutiva Real Food Manifesto

Apple – We Are the Crazy Ones

Apple Corporate Values

Creator

Apple CEO Tim Cook shared the following when he was Chief Operating Officer (COO) under Steve Jobs.  

Purpose

During the period when Steve Jobs was unwell and on medical leave, financial analysts asked Tim Cook how Apple would operate without Jobs. This was his reply.

Apple Logo

Manifesto

There is an extraordinary breadth and depth in our more than 35,000 employees, who are all wicked smart. And that’s in all areas of the company from engineering to marketing, operations and sales and all the rest. The values of our company are all extremely well entrenched.

We believe that we’re on the face of the earth to make great products and that’s not changing. We’re constantly focusing on innovating. We believe in the simple, not the complex.

We believe we need to own and control the primary technologies behind the products that we make and participate only in markets where we can make a significant contribution.

We believe in saying no to thousands of projects so that we can focus on the few that are meaningful to us. We believe in deep collaboration and cross pollination in order to innovate in a way others cannot.

We don’t settle for anything other than excellence in any group in the company, and we have the self-honesty to admit when we’re wrong and the courage to change.

Regardless of who is in what job, those values are so embedded in this company that Apple will do extremely well. And I would just iterate a point Peter made in his opening comments. I strongly believe that Apple is doing the best work in its history.

Source

https://www.macobserver.com/tmo/article/apple_coo_tim_cook_lays_out_apple_manifesto_with_or_without_steve_jobs/

Comment

If we top and tail this comment we have four distinct phrases that epitomize a manifesto as a set of corporate values.

They can be summarized as:

  1. Great products (goal)
  2. Innovate
  3. Simple not complex
  4. Focus on the few
  5. Deep collaboration
  6. Cross pollination
  7. Excellence
  8. Self-honesty
  9. Courage

If you want a shortcut to writing your manifesto, then start a series of statements with the words: ‘We Believe’.

More

Apple: We Are the Crazy Ones

Mike Markkula – The Apple Marketing Philosophy

Zappos Core Values Frog

Easy Jet Customer Charter

Creator

Easy Jet is a low-cost British based airline with headquarters in London. It operates domestic and international services on over 1000 routes in more than 30 countries.

Purpose

Orange Spirit

Our mission has always been to make travel easy and affordable for all. When we started out over 20 years ago we challenged the status quo with the introduction of low fares. We didn’t accept the industry norms and we set about doing things differently. This ambition continues to drive us today.

But it’s not just about what we do, it’s how we do it and why we do it that shapes us as a business.

At its simplest we’re here to connect people across Europe. These days we’re not alone in doing that but we believe that by doing things in the right way and staying true to our values is good for our customers, our staff and our communities. In a nutshell we call it our Orange Spirit.

The Orange Spirit then shares charters under the following headings:

  1. Change for good
  2. Environment
  3. Diversity
  4. Innovation
  5. Accessibility
  6. Our Promise (their customer charter is shared below)
Easy Jet Customer Charter

Manifesto

Customer Charter

Our promise to you

Our five priorities keep us focused but the key is to make sure we deliver all this from the heart, with passion, ensuring our orange spirit shines through in everything we do.

Safety first – we never compromise – Your safety and security is our number one priority

On your side – we see it from your point of view – We don’t assume that we know best and we make decisions with you in mind

A big smile – friendly service is our passion – You can expect a friendly, helpful and knowledgeable service from all our staff

Make it easy – at every step – We’ll make sure you know what to expect at every step of your journey

Open and upfront – we will always be straight with you – We’ll always be truthful and will keep you informed at all times

Source

https://www.easyjet.com/en/orange-spirit/our-promise

http://corporate.easyjet.com/about/our-values

https://www.easyjet.com/en/orange-spirit

Comment

There are two manifestos on this page. The first is the purpose or mission statement and the second is the customer charter. There is also a link to the company values.

Together they show what is required to deliver purpose throughout a large organisation (with over 10,000 employees) is to provide layers of manifesto in different forms. One single manifesto may not be enough.

The challenge therefore is to keep them simple and consistent. Ideally, you want your people to be able to recite them in some way – at least in intent, if not in precise detail.

The Customer Charter is an important manifesto type for customer service across any organisation.

This one is neat and short – five principles – and in simple everyday language. Each principle is then layered. For example:

Safety first = this is a clear priority

We never compromise = this is a boundary rule – in a difficult situation, this one statement tells you what is required.

Your safety and security is our number one priority – this expands on the first statement – it’s ‘your’ safety, plus ‘your’ security’ that is important.

Could you remember this to act in a crisis? I think so.

There is also an overarching guiding principle here: the orange spirit. It is important to name your charters and principles so that people can refer specifically to them.

In this case, ‘orange spirit’ is a rallying cry for how we want our people to act – in alignment with our company values AND with ‘spirit’.

More

Fader and Toms – Customer Centricity Manifesto

Christopher Carfi – The Social Customer Manifesto

Joseph Jaffe – The Customer Service Manifesto

Gihan Perera – Nine Things Successful Leaders Do Now

Creator

Gihan Perera, author of The Future of Leadership and multiple other books

Purpose

The rules of this manifesto form the basis for a book and training for working with corporate clients.

Gihan Perera - The Future of Leadership: Nine Things Successful Leaders Do Now

Manifesto

Part One: Be a Leader they want to follow

1       Show Up: Make time to lead

2       Speak Up: Cut through the clutter

3       Step Up: Stand for something

Part Two: Build a Team they want to be a part of

4       Light Up: Foster innovation

5       Wise Up: Build their judgment

6       Tune Up: Accelerate the experience curve

Part Three: Reach out to a World that wants to help

7       Team Up: Find talent everywhere

8       Partner Up: Join forces

9       Link Up: Leverage trust

Source

Comment

This is an elegant rule-based manifesto with a simple structure.

First, there are three parts reflecting three levels of leadership – leading the self, leading teams and leading in the wider world. This provides a neat way to provide an overview of your entire framework.

Second, there are three items for each part which provide actions steps and goals to be achieved for each item and each part.

Third, there is a consistent palette of words for each item all used a single keyword combined with ‘up’ as a consistent phrase. When this works well it is simple and elegant. Be cautious of forcing words to fit as it may come across as being contrived.

More

Dr Alan Graham – A Toxic Leader Manifesto – the other side of leadership, how not to do it

Geoff McDonald – The Expert Manifesto

Napoleon Hill – Laws of Success

Opted Out Life Manifesto

Creator

Elena Mutonono and Veronika Palovsak are co-authors of Opted Out of the ‘Real Job’.

Purpose

Elena and Veronika opted out of their ‘real jobs’ and built small online businesses to have more freedom and flexibility to pursue their dreams.

Their book and manifesto is intended to encourage and assist “restless cubicle professionals” to do the same.

Manifesto

We are the mavericks and the heretics in the online teaching world. We have opted out of the stifling ‘real job’ environment, the ‘safety’ nets, the endless money chase, the hopelessness and apathy, to create value and meaning through our small and smart online businesses.

We believe that ideas change minds, lives and destinies. We want to bring our fresh creativity to the world.

We want to teach because it empowers people to improve lives, think differently, create original art and do the work that matters.

We do the impossible. We step into the unknown. We challenge limitations. We conquer our fears. We work from our core. We opt out of whining. We don’t complain.

We take the first step and we don’t turn back. We opt into courage. We strive to make a change. We fail and we stand strong. Then we do it again.

Among huge corporations that stamp cheap commodities, we make art that impacts people for good. Every day, we opt out of this world’s imposed scarcity and choose to grow abundance through the talents we’ve been given. We don’t wait until we’re smarter or more experienced or wealthier. We don’t save our art of a rainy day. We share it now because tomorrow is not guaranteed.

We live an opted out life.

Source

Comment

This is a classic word based set of rules for life.

While the context of helping teachers (or instructional designers) step out of their workplace cubicle and into a freelance or self-employed role is a deep niche, their manifesto reads as a general situation that could fit for many other groups.

This could be good and bad. It could be good because it speaks to a wide audience. It could be bad because it is too general and doesn’t speak closely enough to the needs, wants and desires of your intended audience and therefore may fail to engage them.

The simple key to getting this right is to test your manifesto. Once you’ve written it, share it with the your chosen market. Listen to their comments and feedback and adjust accordingly.

There is no right answer here, simply whether the manifesto you have written plays its part in helping you fulfil your desired result.

More

Flying Solo Micro Small Business Manifesto

Academic Slow Food Manifesto

Remote Year Values