Haydn Shaughnessy: The New Work Manifesto

The New Work Manifesto

Creator: Haydn Shaughnessy writes for Forbes.com about Innovation within the New Economy.

Purpose: The stats show that unto 66% of US workers are actively dis-engaged with their work. That means only 33% are! Thus the search for meaning and empowerment from ‘unconventional’ sources.

The New Work Manifesto: Be Unconventional (Selection)

People are busy adding unconventional twists to their lives and their narratives, building twists like minimalism, reducing our dependency on material possessions – there’s a list of minimalist growth indicators here; or it’s about collective as well as personal innovation: looking for ways to engage, transitioning the relationship between the town and the countryside – or the wacky art allied to gardening, the vegan tattoo, or the conventionally unconventional like the street food movement.

The New Work Manifesto is I want to do it my way. This is not just or even a Gen Y phenomenon. It is a story that 66% of us might want to tell. So how do we reconcile people’s desire for personal innovation with the enterprise’s need for innovative people and ideas?

A couple of years ago I interviewed an artist at the Disonancias project which arranges artist residencies inside Spanish companies. Her observation of working in a company? Everything I proposed they found a way to cut.

As an artist she was accustomed to starting small and growing a creative work. In business she started small and still got cut.

Enterprise leaders need to look to how people are innovating and creating and then set out how they want to interact with the workforce. We have to take the personal seriously.

 

Source

Full Article on Forbes.com: The New Work Manifesto: Be Unconventional, 24 June 2011

Image from Daylife: Job Seekers waiting to talk to employment agencies.

 

 

Christopher Carfi: The Social Customer Manifesto

Christopher Carfi: The Social Customer Manifesto

Creator: Christopher Carfi, is a blogger at The Social Customer Manifesto.

Purpose: “…customers across all industries are getting really tired of being spun, misled, and lied to.” This manifesto gives a voice to customers in the new social world (social media).

The Social Customer Manifesto

I want to have a say.

I don’t want to do business with idiots.

I want to know when something is wrong, and what you’re going to do to fix it.

I want to help shape things that I’ll find useful.

I want to connect with others who are working on similar problems.

I don’t want to be called by another salesperson. Ever. (Unless they have something useful. Then I want it yesterday.)

I want to buy things on my schedule, not yours. I don’t care if it’s the end of your quarter.

I want to know your selling process.

I want to tell you when you’re screwing up. Conversely, I’m happy to tell you the things that you are doing well. I may even tell you what your competitors are doing.

I want to do business with companies that act in a transparent and ethical manner.

I want to know what’s next. We’re in partnership…where should we go?

 

Source

The Social Customer Manifesto Blog Post

The Blackberry Manifesto

Blackberry Manifesto

Creator: In the spirit of the Peanut Butter Manifesto, An open letter from a high level anonymous RIM employee, makers of the Blackberry.

Purpose: RIM is not doing as this employee would like. They’re struggling and this is what he would do to make things better.

The Blackberry Manifesto

To the RIM Senior Management Team:

I have lost confidence.

While I hide it at work, my passion has been sapped. I know I am not alone — the sentiment is widespread and it includes people within your own teams.

Mike and Jim, please take the time to really absorb and digest the content of this letter because it reflects the feeling across a huge percentage of your employee base. You have many smart employees, many that have great ideas for the future, but unfortunately the culture at RIM does not allow us to speak openly without having to worry about the career-limiting effects.

Before I get into the meat of the matter, I will say I am not part of a large group of bitter employees wishing to embarrass us. Rather, I believe these points need to be heard and I desperately want RIM to regain its position as a successful industry leader. Our carriers, distributors, alliance partners, enterprise customers, and our loyal end users all want the same thing… for BlackBerry to once again be leading the pack.

We are in the middle of major “transition” and things have never been more chaotic. Almost every project is falling further and further behind schedule at a time when we absolutely must deliver great, solid products on time. We urge you to make bold decisions about our organisational structure, about our culture and most importantly our products.

While we anxiously wait to see the details of the streamlining plan, here are some suggestions:

(Headings Only)

  1. Focus on the End User experience
  2. Recruit Senior SW Leaders & enable decision-making
  3. Cut projects to the bone.
  4. Developers, not Carriers can now make or break us
  5. Need for serious marketing punch to create end user desire
  6. No Accountability – Canadians are too nice
  7. The press and analysts are pissing you off. Don’t snap. Now is the time for humility with a dash of paranoia.
  8. Democratise. Engage and interact with your employees — please!

 

Source

BGR.com blog by Jonathan S Geller

Related Manifestos

The Peanut Butter Manifesto

 

 

Brad Garlinghouse: The Peanut Butter Manifesto

The Peanut Butter Manifesto

Creator: Brad Garlinghouse, a Yahoo senior vice president, created this manifesto as an internal document. (2006)

Purpose: Yahoo wasn’t doing as well as Brad liked so he offered his thoughts as to how to fix the problems. Simply put he suggested ‘Yahoo is spreading its resources too thinly, like peanut butter on a slice of bread.’

The Peanut Butter Manifesto (excerpt)

Three and half years ago, I enthusiastically joined Yahoo! The magnitude of the opportunity was only matched by the magnitude of the assets. And an amazing team has been responsible for rebuilding Yahoo!

It has been a profound experience. I am fortunate to have been a part of dramatic change for the Company. And our successes speak for themselves. More users than ever, more engaging than ever and more profitable than ever!

I proudly bleed purple and yellow everyday! And like so many people here, I love this company

But all is not well. Last Thursday’s NY Times article was a blessing in the disguise of a painful public flogging. While it lacked accurate details, its conclusions rang true, and thus was a much needed wake up call. But also a call to action. A clear statement with which I, and far too many Yahoo’s, agreed. And thankfully a reminder. A reminder that the measure of any person is not in how many times he or she falls down – but rather the spirit and resolve used to get back up. The same is now true of our Company.

It’s time for us to get back up.

I believe we must embrace our problems and challenges and that we must take decisive action. We have the opportunity – in fact the invitation – to send a strong, clear and powerful message to our shareholders and Wall Street, to our advertisers and our partners, to our employees (both current and future), and to our users. They are all begging for a signal that we recognize and understand our problems, and that we are charting a course for fundamental change. Our current course and speed simply will not get us there. Short-term band-aids will not get us there.

It’s time for us to get back up and seize this invitation.

 

…Our inclination and proclivity to repeatedly hire leaders from outside the company results in disparate visions of what winning looks like — rather than a leadership team rallying around a single cohesive strategy.

I’ve heard our strategy described as spreading peanut butter across the myriad opportunities that continue to evolve in the online world. The result: a thin layer of investment spread across everything we do and thus we focus on nothing in particular.

I hate peanut butter. We all should…

 

Source

Wall Street Journal Article displaying the full manifesto (published November 18, 2006)

 

Quigley and Baghaic: As One Manifesto

Quigley and Baghaic: The 'As One' Manifesto

Creator: James Quigley is CEO of Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, and Mehrdad Baghai is Managing Director of Alchemy Growth Partners.

Purpose: A manifesto for transforming individual action into collective power and “…help you realise the full power of your people.” As One is the Deloitte organisations global initiative on collective leadership.

The As One Manifesto (summary)

Adding the phrase “as one” to another word changes its entire meaning. Imagine the possibilities… The sources of inspiration are endless. Believing As One. Stronger As One. Succeeding As One.

 

Leadership = People + Purpose + Productivity

 

Three Key Elements to Collective Leadership

1 Shared Identity as part of the larger organisation

2 Direction Intensity to impel people to contribute

3 Common Interpretation to foster cooperation

 

Eight Leadership Styles – because not all people are the same

1 Landlord <> Tenant

2 Community Organiser <> Volunteers

3 Conductor <> Orchestra

4 Producer <> Creative Team

5 General <> Soldiers

6 Architect <> Builders

7 Captain <> Sports Team

8 Senator <> Citizens

 

The timeless challenge of leadership is that you cannot get large groups of people to behave As One if they do not identify with each other as a unified group or team.

 

Applying the As One Approach

1 Diagnostic

2 Interventions

3 Adoptions

 

Source

Download the ebook of the As One Manifesto from Change This

Join their campaign

Deloitte Campaign Page

Buy the Book As One

The banner image is from the cover of the Change This ebook

Harvey Ball: Smiley Face

Creator: In 1963, Harvey Ball, an American commercial artist, was commissioned by an advertising agency to create a happy face for the New York radio station WMCA.

Purpose: WMCA were running a competition was to promote ‘WMCA Good Guys’ and as a result the smiley logo was designed to fit on a button.

Icon Manifesto

Smiley Face

Source

Smiley Face on Wikipedia

Hannah Samuel: The 10 Commandments of Reputation Branding

Hannah Samuel: Reputation Branding Ten CommandmentsCreator: Hannah Samuel, co-author of The Integrity Factor with Ricky Nowak.

Purpose: We need guidelines to make sure we can create and maintain a positive reputation.

The 10 Commandments of Reputation Branding

1. Make it easy for others to speak well of you

2. Keep abreast of changing values and expectations

3. Seek win-win outcomes from every interaction

4. Never assume others think or feel the same way you do

5. Do not gossip or be disparaging about your competitors

6. When in doubt, ask yourself: ‘Is this likely to damage or enhance my reputation?’

7. Accept responsibility and accountability for your actions

8. Avoid over-promising and under-delivering

9. Never breach the bond of trust you build with clients and others

10. Always act with integrity

 

Source

Authors Website: http://www.hannahsamuel.com/

Manifesto spotted in Hannah’s newsletter.

Facebook Page: www.Facebook.com/HannahSamuelSpeaker

Community Engine Culture, People and Core Values

Stephen Johnson: The Third Place Manifesto

Creator: Community Engine: provides social media, membership management & community engagement technology, products and services for all types of organisations, including business, government and the not-for-profit sector.

Purpose: To build a successful organisation.

Manifesto

Our Culture and People

We’re a smart, creative and agile group of people, with a relentlessly positive culture that supports rapid change and fast growth.

We have a track record of achieving big things. How do we manage it? By openly recognising and addressing the challenges that face us.

Get used to learning by doing. We keep our business agile by practicing the art of achieving clarity through action – by acting, reflecting and reacting rapidly.

We believe simplicity is everything. From the way we engage with customers to the way we design, build and support our software – we look to simplify. We even made it a verb: to ‘simplicate’.

Our core values, simply stated

We make software with a purpose.

Social networking software has the power to improve the way we live, work and play. Our mission is to put the power of social network publishing into the hands of the community, for the benefit of all.

We work with – not for – Community Engine.

We make software for collaboration and we collaborate at work and with our customers.

We seek to ‘simplicate’ everything.

From the way we engage with our customers to the way we design, build and support our software; we look to simplify. Simple is strong, easy to grasp and quick to learn. Simple scales rapidly, and we grow fast.

We seek clarity through action.

We believe in the power of doing, so get stuck in and have a go. Through experimentation, risk and measurement we learn more, faster, about what works better.

We are relentlessly positive.

We believe every challenge contains an opportunity. It may be wrapped in many layers of cheap, nasty paper, but it’s in there.

We employ self-sustaining people.

We employ the brightest talent, provide them with a collaborative and supporting environment and allow them to grow.

Customers matter.

Our customers give us their time, money and trust. In return, we owe them great service, intuitive products and respect.

Source

Website: http://www.communityengine.com/careers/culture-and-people/

Greg Costikyan: The Scratchware Manifesto

The Gaming Manifesto

Creator: Greg Costikyan, CEO of Manifesto Games.

Purpose: To inspire the gaming industry to being innovative and exciting and not the “morass of drudgery and imitation” it is becoming.

The Scratchware Manifesto

The machinery of gaming has run amok.

Instead of serving creative vision, it suppresses it. Instead of encouraging innovation, it represses it. Instead of taking its cue from our most imaginative minds, it takes its cue from the latest month’s PC Data list. Instead of rewarding those who succeed, it penalizes them with development budgets so high and royalties so low that there can be no reward for creators. Instead of ascribing credit to those who deserve it, it seeks to associate success with the corporate machine.

It is time for revolution.

The Manifesto defines three gaming industry problems and three missions to overcome them:

Problem 1: Driven by Moore’s Law

Mission 1: Build a viable channel for independently-created games.

 

Problem 2: The narrowness of the retail channel

Mission 2: To create a long tail for games, to allow a thousand different games to find their audience, to smash the iron logic that prohibits innovation.

 

Problem 3: Publisher cowardice.

Mission 3: To sustain the enormous ferment of creativity we’ve seen over the last three decades into the future, even as the mainstream game industry becomes tired and decayed.

 

There are also sections titled:

Games are Art

Creators Should Have an Upside

Gamers Rule

 

And the manifesto concludes with a call to…

Join the Revolution

Join us, and help build a better tomorrow. Get the word out that there’s more to games than you’ll find at Best Buy, and that Manifesto Games is the place to find the best of the rest, the products of individual vision, games created for love and not at the behest of some blinkered suit whose last job was selling Tide.

Let a thousand flowers blossom; let a thousand different games contend.

From now on, we must all strive resolutely to bring about the overthrow of the existing order.

Gameplay over glitz.

Dmitri Shapiro: The Anti-Facebook Manifesto

The Anti-Facebook or Alty Manifesto

Creator: Dmitry Shapiro, the founder of Veoh and former CTo of MySpace Music has just received startup funding for Altly, an alternative to Facebook.

Purpose: To overcome feeling pressured to ‘friend’ someone on Facebook, Altly will be an alternative social network to Facebook. At it’s core is a different set of beliefs around privacy and the use of our personal information.

The Altly Manifesto

Altly (name may change before we launch) is building a Facebook alternative.  Think of it as a social network for Facebook graduates!

We believe :

• Privacy is ULTIMATELY important.

• We should know EXACTLY who can see what information about us.

• Control of our information should be in OUR hands, and it should be EXTREMELY easy for us to control it.

• WE should choose what information is stored, how long it is kept, and who it is available to.

• Our digital life, our personal information is EXTREMELY valuable, and each of us should not only control who has access to it, but BENEFIT from it.

• Advertisers should be part of our community, but should NOT have an unfair advantage over us.

• All of our data should be OURS, and no one else’s.  If we choose to leave our social network, we should be able to easily take ALL of our data with us, and COMPLETELY delete all data if we choose.

• If other social networks should be developed, they should be able to interoperate with one another.

Source

Author’s complete Blog Article: http://blog.altly.com/2011/05/the-need-for-an-alternative-to-facebook/

Article about Alty Funding: http://www.socaltech.com/altly_posts_anti_facebook_manifesto_gets_funding/s-0035969.html