Gary Nabhan: A Terroir-ist’s Manifesto for Eating in Place

Good Food World

Creator: Gary Paul Nabhan, Distinguished Professor, Southwest Center and Department of Geography, University of Arizona

Purpose: “A Terroir comes from the word terre “land”. It was originally a French term in wine, coffee and tea used to denote the special characteristics that the geography, geology and climate of a certain place bestowed upon particular varieties.” (Source Wikipedia)

Manifesto (edited)

Know where your food has come from through knowing those who produced it for you, from farmer to forager, rancher or fisher to earthworms…

Know where your food has come from by the very way it tastes: its freshness telling you how far it may have traveled…

Know where your food has come from by ascertaining the health & wealth of those who picked & processed it, by the fertility of the soil that is left in the patch where it once grew, by the traces of pesticides found in the birds & the bees there…

Know where your food comes from by the richness of stories told around the table recalling all that was harvested nearby?during the years that came before you…

Know where your foods come from by the patience displayed while putting them up, while peeling, skinning, coring or gutting them, while pit-roasting, poaching or fermenting them, while canning, salting or smoking them, while arranging them on a plate for our eyes to behold.

When you know where your food comes from you can give something back to those lands & waters, that rural culture, that migrant harvester, curer, smoker, poacher, roaster or vinyer.

Source

For the complete manifesto on Good Food World – 16 November 2010

Terroir on Wikipedia

 

Jo Beth Richards: Mantras and Manifestos

Jo Beth Richards Mantras and Manifestos

Creator: Jo Beth Richards is a yoga teacher and blogger at GroovyGirlYoga.com

Purpose: Enough anger exists in the world, choose to spread goodness.

Mantras & Manifestos

Enough anger exists in the world, choose to spread goodness

Live in Light

Spread Peace

Give Love

Pray Often

Live with passion

Never hold back

Smile

Expand your heart

Today is your day

You are all that is beautiful in this world

Give back, of your time & yourself

Give thanks, always

Love with abandon

Radiate your joy

See the beauty in everyday

Be the beauty in everyday

Shine your soul

Release the need to worry

Give into your greatness

Love yourself

Embrace change

Accept the love you are given

Share your unique Spirit

Love FULLY

Speak freely & with compassion

Forgive

Have faith

Spread kindness

BE LOVE!

Embrace one or all of these, & expand your greatness into the Universe!

Much love, joy & hope,

Jo Beth

 

Source

Blog Post from Jo Beth’s Website: 25 August 2011

Image from Jo Beth’s Website

 

Yellow Warriors Society of the Philippines: Yellow Manifesto

Creator: The Yellow Warriors Society of the Philippines (YWSP)

Purpose: To educate “on healthy lifestyle practices and stricter medical procedures to prevent contamination, provide better access to hepatitis treatment and implement and monitor labor laws for the protection of hepatitis patients and non-HBV (non-Hepatitis B virus) workers in the workplace.”

 The Yellow Manifesto

The Yellow Manifesto

 

Source

Article on the Business Inquirer by Theresa S. Samaniego, 12th August 2011.

 

Dr Phil McGraw: Ten Life Laws

Dr Phil McGraw: Ten Life Laws

Creator: Dr Phil McGraw is an American television personality, author and psychologist.

Purpose: As Dr Phil says: “Are you really living or just existing? Get excited about your life!”

Manifesto: Dr. Phil’s Ten Life Laws

Life Law #1: You either get it or you don’t.

Strategy: Become one of those who gets it.

Life Law #2: You create your own experience.

Strategy: Acknowledge and accept accountability for your life. Understand your role in creating results.

Life Law #3: People do what works.

Strategy: Identify the payoffs that drive your behavior and that of others.

Life Law #4: You cannot change what you do not acknowledge.

Strategy: Get real with yourself about life and everybody in it. Be truthful about what isn’t working in your life. Stop making excuses and start making results.

Life Law #5: Life rewards action.

Strategy: Make careful decisions and then pull the trigger. Learn that the world couldn’t care less about thoughts without actions.

Life Law #6: There is no reality, only perception.

Strategy: Identify the filters through which you view the world. Acknowledge your history without being controlled by it.

Life Law #7: Life is managed; it is not cured.

Strategy: Learn to take charge of your life and hold on. This is a long ride, and you are the driver every single day.

Life Law #8: We teach people how to treat us.

Strategy: Own, rather than complain about, how people treat you. Learn to renegotiate your relationships to have what you want.

Life Law #9: There is power in forgiveness.

Strategy: Open your eyes to what anger and resentment are doing to you. Take your power back from those who have hurt you.

Life Law #10: You have to name it before you can claim it.

Strategy: Get clear about what you want and take your turn.

 

Source

Full article with detailed explanations of each Life Law on Dr Phil’s Website

Dr Phil on Wikipedia

Image from Wikipedia

 

Miyamoto Musahi : 21 Rules To Live Your Life

Miyamoto Musahi: 21 Rules For Life

Creator: Miyamoto Musahi is widely regarded as one of the greatest warriors of all time. He lived from 1584 to 1645 and is the author of The Book of Five Rings.

Purpose: Musahi’s rules for life as he prepared for his own death.

Manifesto: 21 Rules to Live Your Life

1. Accept everything just the way it is

2. Do not seek pleasure for its own sake

3. Do not, under any circumstances, depend on a partial feeling

4. Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world

5. Be detached from desire your whole life long

6. Do not regret what you have done

7. Never be jealous

8. Never let yourself be saddened by a separation

9. Resentment and complaint are appropriate neither for oneself or others

10. Do not let yourself be guided by the feeling of lust or love

11. In all things have no preferences

12. Be indifferent to where you live

13. Do not pursue the taste of good food

14. Do not hold on to possessions you no longer need

15. Do not act following customary beliefs

16. Do not collect weapons or practice with weapons beyond what is useful

17. Do not fear death

18. Do not seek to possess either goods or fiefs for your old age

19. Respect Buddha and the gods without counting on their help

20. You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honour

21. Never stray from the Way

 

Source

The Full 21 Rules with commentary by blogger Brett Hagberg

Miyamoto Musashi on Wikipedia

Image from Wikipedia

 

Brian Johnson: Five Rules For Life

Five Rules of Life

Creator: Brian Johnson, marketing consultant who lives in New York City.

Purpose: Five Rules For Life invites people from all walks of life to share what they believe are the most important rules to follow for a happy, successful and fulfilling life.

Here are Brian’s “Five Rules For Life”:

 1.) Challenge yourself.

Set goals that make you s-t-r-e-t-c-h. It is a cop-out to make things too easy – always take it to the next level and don’t be afraid to fail. I would rather fail trying to do something that made me expand my abilities and work harder than I ever thought I could rather than succeed at doing something I knew I could accomplish with my eyes closed.

2.) Make yourself a brand.

Sit down and decide what you want to be, and what you want people to associate with you. Map it out and then work hard to make it a reality. When people think of me they think of three things: someone that helps organizations with their image and messaging; a captivating and entertaining speaker; a loving husband and father. That is my brand. Who are you?

3.) Realize that happiness isn’t something you “obtain”.

The sooner you realize that happiness is not something you obtain like a piece of furniture or a job, the more likely you are to achieve it. Most people think they will be happy if they get a promotion, make a sale, start a relationship with someone, or buy a certain kind of car. But happiness is created, not acquired. Have you ever wondered why – as a general rule – people with less are happier than people with more?

4.) Live responsibly.

This has many meanings to me – but basically it means don’t ignore injustices, treat others with respect, do what is right for the world and environment, and quit thinking it is “someone else’s” job.

5.) Get a dog.

A dog loves you unconditionally. A dog thinks you are the greatest, coolest, smartest, most successful person in the world. Get a dog and work hard to live up to its expectations.

 

Source

For 10 more Rules from Life from featured Authors

 

 

Matthew Kimberly: Get a Grip

Matthew Kimberly: Get A Grip

Creator: Matthew Kimberly, author of How to Get a Grip – No Bullshit self-help. Get a grip on yourself. Take responsibility. Do it.

Purpose: A guide for focussing on the important stuff.

Manifesto: Ten Things You Should Already Know By Now

1. What’s important today won’t matter tomorrow

Yeah, so you got a problem. Sleep on it, sunshine. Put it off. Most problems can be safely ignored. You’ll be amazed how often they sort themselves out. And the gravity of any given problem is inversely proportional to the hour of the day. At three in the morning,  you’ve got an insurmountable issue. After four whisky and cokes at nine in the evening, you haven’t even got an inkling of a problem.

2. Everybody else is furiously improvising, so you can too

Show me an expert and I’ll show you a charlatan. FAKE IT ‘TIL YOU MAKE IT, amigo. 21 year old lifestyle design guru? Hell yeah! Fat, unemployed life-coach? Why not? Homeopathy professional? Whatever, bring it on! Choose your path, and then Act As If You’re Wearing A Cape.

3. Nobody thinks about you as much as you think about you

Really. They don’t. For example, I’m not thinking about you now. But I bet you are.

4. It’s OK to piss people off

But if you’re pissing everybody off, all the time, it’s time to quit being a fucking asshole.

5. Aspiration is for suckers

6. Nobody tells all the truth, all the time

So lower your expectations of people. When put in a spot, people fib. We men lie about our alcohol consumption all the time. When we’re young and say we had six beers, we probably only had three. Nowadays, if we say we only had three beers, you can be sure it was closer to six. It doesn’t mean we don’t love you

7. Life doesn’t get better – only your perception of life improves

There was a little man with a lame left leg. He lived on the outskirts of town in a tumble-down house. He had a hole in his roof, and water would come in day and night. His lame left leg meant he couldn’t go out to work, so he survived on the charity of others, who would give him scraps of food. Sometimes he would go for two days and nights with nothing to eat.  One day, the town council decided to fix his roof. The little man with the lame left leg became the happiest person you have ever seen. He was so grateful to be dry that he would smile and sing for the passersby all day long.

8. Your family comes first, but not to the detriment of everything else

You want to go out with the girls? Tell your husband to make his own dinner. And gents, you don’t need permission for that once-a-year trip to Vegas, you just need to communicate it properly.

9. You’re wrong as often as you’re right

So don’t dwell on either.

10. Men should never wear wigs

 

Source

Article on How to Get A Grip

Jurgen Wolff: The Creativity Success Manifesto

Creativity Success Manifesto

Creator: Jurgen Wolff is a writer, teacher, and hypnotherapist. His goal is to help individuals liberate their own creativity through specific techniques that can be used at work as well as at home.

Purpose: To give your creative endeavours the best chance of success.

The Creativity Success Manifesto (Edited)

1: Success is what you say it is.

2: Success can take one year or one hundred years.

3: Fewer than 1% of people have to buy what you do.

4: Start by finding one person who likes what you do.

5: Crazy is the first step. Every breakthrough is considered a crackpot idea at first. Of course, some ARE crackpot ideas. You can’t tell the difference until you transform the idea into something real and get it out into the world.

6: Ready, fire, aim: It will never be the exactly the right time and you may never have ALL the resources you need. Get a prototype out there, see what happens, adjust, and persist.

7: The second best time to start: The best time to start doing your creative work is twenty years ago. Look at the clock. What time is it? That’s right, it’s the second-best time to start.

8: If at first you don’t succeed, don’t try, try again. At least don’t try the same damn thing again and again. …If at first you don’t succeed, try something different. Continue until you find the one that works.

9: Failing feels crappy. Motivational speakers make it sound like failing is noble. Maybe it is, but it sure doesn’t FEEL noble. …Yeah, we have to deal with disappointing results and rejection, but we won’t like it.

10: The only way to actually fail: You can fail only if you stop.

 

Source

Complete article and manifesto on Management-Issues.com

 

Cal Newport: The Career Craftsman Manifesto

Cal Newport: The Career Craftsman Manifesto

Creator: Cal Newport is an Assistant Professor at Georgetown University and author of three books for students.

Purpose: Studying for his PhD at MIT, Newport was seeking the underlying patterns of a students success. He’s now applied this philosophy to ‘career’.

A Career Manifesto

Career advice has fallen into a terribly simplistic rut. Figure out what you’re passionate about, then follow that passion: this idea provides the foundation for just about every guide to improving your working life.

The Career Craftsman rejects this reductionist drivel.

The Career Craftsman understands that “follow your passion and all will be happy” is a children’s tale. Most people don’t have pre-existing passions waiting to be unearthed. Happiness requires more than solving a simple matching problem.

The Career Craftsman knows there’s no magical “right job” waiting out there for you. Any number of pursuits can provide the foundation for an engaging life.

The Career Craftsman believes that compelling careers are not courageously pursued or serendipitously discovered, but are instead systematically crafted.

The Career Craftsman believes this process of career crafting always begins with the mastery of something rare and valuable. The traits that define great work (autonomy, creativity, impact, recognition) are rare and valuable themselves, and you need something to offer in return. Put another way: no one owes you a fulfilling job; you have to earn it.

The Career Craftsman believes that mastery is just the first step in crafting work you love. Once you have the leverage of a rare and valuable skill, you need to apply this leverage strategically to make your working life increasingly fulfulling. It is then — and only then — that you should expect a feeling of passion for your work to truly take hold.

The Career Craftsman thinks the idea that “societal expectations” are trying to hold you down in a safe but boring career path is a boogeyman invented to sell eBooks. You don’t need courage to create a cool life. You need the type of valuable skills that let you write your own ticket.

The Career Craftsman never expects to love an entry level job (or to stay in that job long before moving up).

The Career Craftsman thinks “is this my calling?” is a stupid question.

The Career Craftsman is data-driven. Admire someone’s career? Work out exactly how they made it happen. The answers you’ll find will be less romantic but more actionable than you might expect.

The Career Craftsman believes the color of your parachute is irrelevant if you take the time to get good at flying the damn plane in the first place.

 

Source

Blog post on Study Hacks