The Open Cloud Computing Manifesto

Open Cloud Computing Manifesto

Creator: Developed by and open community of interested parties – vendors and providers.

Purpose: Public Declaration of principles and intentions for cloud computing providers and vendors based on the view the ‘cloud’ should be open.

Manifesto

Open Cloud Computing Principles

1. User centric systems enrich the lives of individuals, education, communication, collaboration, business, entertainment and society as a whole; the end user is the primary stakeholder in cloud computing.

2. Philanthropic initiatives don’t work!

3. Openness of standards, systems and software empowers and protects users; existing standards should be adopted where possible for the benefit of all stakeholders.

4. Transparency fosters trust and accountability; decisions should be open to public collaboration and scrutiny and never be made “behind closed doors”.

5. Interoperability ensures effectiveness of cloud computing as a public resource; systems must be interoperable over a minimal set of community defined standards and vendor lock-in must be avoided.

6. Representation of all stakeholders is essential; interoperability and standards efforts should not be dominated by vendor(s).

7. Discrimination against any party for any reason is unacceptable; barriers to entry must be minimised.

8. Evolution is an ongoing process in an immature market; standards may take some time to develop and coalesce but activities should be coordinated and collaborative.

9. Balance of commercial and consumer interests is paramount; if in doubt consumer interests prevail.

10. Security is fundamental, not optional.

Sources

General: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_Computing_Manifesto

Community: http://www.opencloudmanifesto.org/

Agile Software

Agile Software Manifesto

Creator: In 2001, 17 people from various software companies met in the mountains of Utah.
Purpose: Need for an alternative to documentation driven, heavyweight software development processes convened.

Manifesto

We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:

  • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
  • Working software over comprehensive documentation
  • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
  • Responding to change over following a plan
  • That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.

Principles behind the Agile Software Manifesto

We follow these principles:

  • Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
  • Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer’s competitive advantage.
  • Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
  • Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.
  • Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.
  • The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.
  • Working software is the primary measure of progress.
  • Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.
  • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
  • Simplicity – the art of maximizing the amount of work not done – is essential.
  • The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams.
  • At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

Sources

More details: http://agilemanifesto.org/
Thanks to Chris Curnow for pointing this one out.